Research Topic

Adipose Tissue and Skeletal Muscle as Endocrine Organs: Role of Cytokines in Health and Disease

About this Research Topic

One of the central factors in maintaining energy regulation is preserving the healthy function of white adipose tissue. This is because the excess of this tissue is associated with metabolic dysfunctions, which promote a positive energy balance and elevated inflammatory adipokines, causing obesity and metabolic syndrome. Such disturbances in energy homeostasis can induce specific immune responses, which can have a beneficial influence on the pathophysiology of a number of diseases.

Thus, cytokines that promote physiological actions in the body have been approached as a potential therapeutic in energy regulation. A significant portion of these cytokines are secreted by non-adipose but metabolically active tissues, such as skeletal muscle (myokines) and liver, and may act in a corrective manner on inflammatory adipokines that are involved in the development of obesity. This means that several cytokines can inhibit or suppress the action of adipokines associated with the inflammatory obesity phenotype, as happens with some myokines.

In this sense, the importance of physical activity is emphasized, since the benefits provided go far beyond the mechanical adaptations and control of energy homeostasis of the skeletal muscle. But the existence of humoral components, that control the adaptive processes of the skeletal muscle acting as paracrine, autocrine and endocrine regulators. Among the endocrine functions attributed to myokines, the regulation of body weight favoring a negative energy balance, the reduction of low-grade inflammation, and the regulation of insulin signaling highlight them as promising for the treatment of chronic diseases such as obesity and diabetes mellitus.

Since then, the list of myokines that are secreted in response to muscle contraction has been growing steadily and new factors have been identified. Therefore, knowing the factors related to the metabolism of physical exercise, which act in the energy regulation of the adipose tissue through the interaction between metabolically active tissues, allow the consolidation of this crosstalk and may contribute to the recovery of energy homeostasis, mechanisms which, until now, are not completely understood.

This Frontiers Research Topic seeks a broad range of articles in the following areas:

- The metabolic regulations that take occur between the adipose tissue and the muscle influenced by exercise;

- The relationships between the different myokines and adipokines in response to exercise;

- Metabolic disorders related to adipose tissue;

- Mechanisms involved in the energy balance regulation process.


Keywords: Physical activity, Adipose tissue, Cytokines, Muscle tissue, Metabolism


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

One of the central factors in maintaining energy regulation is preserving the healthy function of white adipose tissue. This is because the excess of this tissue is associated with metabolic dysfunctions, which promote a positive energy balance and elevated inflammatory adipokines, causing obesity and metabolic syndrome. Such disturbances in energy homeostasis can induce specific immune responses, which can have a beneficial influence on the pathophysiology of a number of diseases.

Thus, cytokines that promote physiological actions in the body have been approached as a potential therapeutic in energy regulation. A significant portion of these cytokines are secreted by non-adipose but metabolically active tissues, such as skeletal muscle (myokines) and liver, and may act in a corrective manner on inflammatory adipokines that are involved in the development of obesity. This means that several cytokines can inhibit or suppress the action of adipokines associated with the inflammatory obesity phenotype, as happens with some myokines.

In this sense, the importance of physical activity is emphasized, since the benefits provided go far beyond the mechanical adaptations and control of energy homeostasis of the skeletal muscle. But the existence of humoral components, that control the adaptive processes of the skeletal muscle acting as paracrine, autocrine and endocrine regulators. Among the endocrine functions attributed to myokines, the regulation of body weight favoring a negative energy balance, the reduction of low-grade inflammation, and the regulation of insulin signaling highlight them as promising for the treatment of chronic diseases such as obesity and diabetes mellitus.

Since then, the list of myokines that are secreted in response to muscle contraction has been growing steadily and new factors have been identified. Therefore, knowing the factors related to the metabolism of physical exercise, which act in the energy regulation of the adipose tissue through the interaction between metabolically active tissues, allow the consolidation of this crosstalk and may contribute to the recovery of energy homeostasis, mechanisms which, until now, are not completely understood.

This Frontiers Research Topic seeks a broad range of articles in the following areas:

- The metabolic regulations that take occur between the adipose tissue and the muscle influenced by exercise;

- The relationships between the different myokines and adipokines in response to exercise;

- Metabolic disorders related to adipose tissue;

- Mechanisms involved in the energy balance regulation process.


Keywords: Physical activity, Adipose tissue, Cytokines, Muscle tissue, Metabolism


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

16 September 2021 Abstract
17 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

16 September 2021 Abstract
17 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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