Research Topic

Effects of Clinical and Laboratorial Parameters on the Biomechanical Behavior of Indirect Restorative Procedures

About this Research Topic

In contemporary dentistry, the success of indirect restorative procedures can be affected by several parameters during lab processing as well as in the dental practice. In the past, assessment of dental materials’ mechanical properties has been used to predict the clinical success of restorative procedures based purely on materials ranking, without considering how the biomaterials behave in the oral environment. Among these properties, flexural strength, tensile strength, hardness, and toughness have been widely evaluated. Currently, these same mechanical properties are still necessary to characterize a new material and to understand how it should be associated with the classical restorative materials. However, antagonist materials, fatigue performance, pH variation and many other variables are included in recent studies which mimic the complex and restoration-unfriendly oral environment.

The correct processing of materials by technicians and dentists can promote adequate bond strength and durable indirect restorations that will resist chewing loads in the long-term. However, errors in the processing of dental materials sometimes occur due to excessive acid etching, surface defects created by diamond burs, high residual stress concentration, incorrect geometry, excessive polymerization shrinkage, and many other factors that can occur and affect the clinical performance of indirect restorative procedures. There is still a lack of information about how clinical and lab parameters can be controlled, how they affect the treatment performance and if different procedures should be performed when using contemporary dental biomaterials. In addition, the usage of digital technologies in the chairside workflow provides new possibilities that still need to be confirmed in the scientific literature. These parameters are of great interest for both technicians and clinicians, considering that such findings can be applied to standardize the empirical choices promoting adequate dental treatments.

This Research Topic will be a collection of papers around, but not limited to, the following themes:
• Assessment of fatigue performance of indirect restorations;
• Comparison between clinical parameters that can reduce the stress concentration generated during the chewing;
• Evaluation of surface treatments protocols to improve the restoration reliability and clinical performance;
• Long-term simulations elucidating the origin of indirect restoration failure and fracture features;
• Description of processing techniques that make it easier to control restoration manufacturing;
• Procedures to improve the restorations surface morphology before and after clinical adjustments.


Keywords: Microscopy, indirect restorative procedures, Dental Materials, Dental Restoration Failure, Dental Restoration Wear, Operative Dentistry, Prosthodontics, Dental Inlay, Dental Stress Analysis, Mechanical Phenomena


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In contemporary dentistry, the success of indirect restorative procedures can be affected by several parameters during lab processing as well as in the dental practice. In the past, assessment of dental materials’ mechanical properties has been used to predict the clinical success of restorative procedures based purely on materials ranking, without considering how the biomaterials behave in the oral environment. Among these properties, flexural strength, tensile strength, hardness, and toughness have been widely evaluated. Currently, these same mechanical properties are still necessary to characterize a new material and to understand how it should be associated with the classical restorative materials. However, antagonist materials, fatigue performance, pH variation and many other variables are included in recent studies which mimic the complex and restoration-unfriendly oral environment.

The correct processing of materials by technicians and dentists can promote adequate bond strength and durable indirect restorations that will resist chewing loads in the long-term. However, errors in the processing of dental materials sometimes occur due to excessive acid etching, surface defects created by diamond burs, high residual stress concentration, incorrect geometry, excessive polymerization shrinkage, and many other factors that can occur and affect the clinical performance of indirect restorative procedures. There is still a lack of information about how clinical and lab parameters can be controlled, how they affect the treatment performance and if different procedures should be performed when using contemporary dental biomaterials. In addition, the usage of digital technologies in the chairside workflow provides new possibilities that still need to be confirmed in the scientific literature. These parameters are of great interest for both technicians and clinicians, considering that such findings can be applied to standardize the empirical choices promoting adequate dental treatments.

This Research Topic will be a collection of papers around, but not limited to, the following themes:
• Assessment of fatigue performance of indirect restorations;
• Comparison between clinical parameters that can reduce the stress concentration generated during the chewing;
• Evaluation of surface treatments protocols to improve the restoration reliability and clinical performance;
• Long-term simulations elucidating the origin of indirect restoration failure and fracture features;
• Description of processing techniques that make it easier to control restoration manufacturing;
• Procedures to improve the restorations surface morphology before and after clinical adjustments.


Keywords: Microscopy, indirect restorative procedures, Dental Materials, Dental Restoration Failure, Dental Restoration Wear, Operative Dentistry, Prosthodontics, Dental Inlay, Dental Stress Analysis, Mechanical Phenomena


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 September 2021 Abstract
31 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

30 September 2021 Abstract
31 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..