Research Topic

Neuronal and cognitive consequences of chronic pain

About this Research Topic

Chronic pain affects the entire person. Its consequences can therefore be best described within the framework of the bio-psycho-social model. However, we are just beginning to understand the true impact of this multisystem condition.

Increasing evidence for instance suggests chronic pain might lead to structural and functional changes in the brain. This notion is based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies that showed among others a decrease in grey matter density in the prefrontal, the anterior cingulate, the motor, as well as the insular cortex and the thalamus. It was found in such diverse conditions as chronic back pain, fibromyalgia, generalized joint pain and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In addition, functional studies utilizing functional MRI, electroencephalography (EEG), and magnetoencephalography (MEG) have shown plastic changes in the brain both in acute and chronic pain conditions.

However, the clinical relevance of these findings or the impact they might have on patients’ lives remains largely elusive. Currently there is only a limited body of evidence to suggest that pain might impair different cognitive domains. Studies for instance have shown that patients’ memory, decision making and number sense might be altered as a consequence of chronic pain. What also remains unclear so far is whether the above mentioned structural or functional alterations in the brains of patients are the reasons or consequences of possible cognitive changes.

We would like to invite authors to:
- critically appraise the existing literature about structural and functional changes in the brains of pain patients and their potential cognitive impacts.
- publish original work that has examined the intricate relationship between structural and/or functional changes in the brain and the function of cognitive domains.

Although we encourage studies that investigate both the neural and cognitive consequences of chronic pain and their relationship, we also welcome research that only focuses on changes in brain structure, brain function or cognition in chronic pain.


Keywords: chronic pain, cognitive consequences, brain, functional change, neural consequences, brain structure, brain function, cognition


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Chronic pain affects the entire person. Its consequences can therefore be best described within the framework of the bio-psycho-social model. However, we are just beginning to understand the true impact of this multisystem condition.

Increasing evidence for instance suggests chronic pain might lead to structural and functional changes in the brain. This notion is based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies that showed among others a decrease in grey matter density in the prefrontal, the anterior cingulate, the motor, as well as the insular cortex and the thalamus. It was found in such diverse conditions as chronic back pain, fibromyalgia, generalized joint pain and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In addition, functional studies utilizing functional MRI, electroencephalography (EEG), and magnetoencephalography (MEG) have shown plastic changes in the brain both in acute and chronic pain conditions.

However, the clinical relevance of these findings or the impact they might have on patients’ lives remains largely elusive. Currently there is only a limited body of evidence to suggest that pain might impair different cognitive domains. Studies for instance have shown that patients’ memory, decision making and number sense might be altered as a consequence of chronic pain. What also remains unclear so far is whether the above mentioned structural or functional alterations in the brains of patients are the reasons or consequences of possible cognitive changes.

We would like to invite authors to:
- critically appraise the existing literature about structural and functional changes in the brains of pain patients and their potential cognitive impacts.
- publish original work that has examined the intricate relationship between structural and/or functional changes in the brain and the function of cognitive domains.

Although we encourage studies that investigate both the neural and cognitive consequences of chronic pain and their relationship, we also welcome research that only focuses on changes in brain structure, brain function or cognition in chronic pain.


Keywords: chronic pain, cognitive consequences, brain, functional change, neural consequences, brain structure, brain function, cognition


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

09 September 2021 Abstract
28 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

09 September 2021 Abstract
28 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..