Research Topic

Genetic Load in Wildlife and its Impact on Population Viability

About this Research Topic

An important aim in conservation genetics is preventing or diminishing (close) inbreeding due to limited population size which may have a negative effect on population viability, particularly when genetic load (decrease of the fitness of the average genotype relative to the fittest genotype) is high. However, even when the genetic load is high effects of inbreeding depression on population viability may be limited or even non-existent. Although a high genetic load can strongly increase local extinction risk, it does not necessarily result in a reduced population growth rate.

It has been argued that in many cases the deleterious alleles responsible for inbreeding depression and genetic load have a limited impact at the population level because of density-dependent processes. Consequently, population size and persistence often do not seem to be affected by the presence of deleterious alleles, even when they are clearly expressed, as shown by e.g. low survival, low reproductive rate, and increased susceptibility to pathogens. Alternatively, deleterious alleles may be epigenetically suppressed. Epigenetic regulation may limit the impact of low genetic diversity on population viability by increasing phenotypic variation. However, the absence of a clear impact of genetic load and inbreeding on population viability may also be (partly) a consequence of underreporting. To date, there are still only a few case studies assessing the magnitude of genetic load and inbreeding depression in the wild, let alone linking this to population viability.

In this Research Topic, we welcome studies on the relationship between neutral diversity, functional diversity, and deleterious alleles on the one hand and inbreeding depression, individual fitness, genetic load, epigenetic regulation and population viability on the other. In particular, we would like to address the following three questions:

1) Under what circumstances does inbreeding result in decreased population viability?
2) Why are some populations stable, or even thriving, despite high inbreeding?
3) What is the role of epigenetic regulation in (suppressing) inbreeding depression and population viability?


Keywords: Inbreeding Depression, Genetic Load, Deleterious Alleles, Population Viability


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

An important aim in conservation genetics is preventing or diminishing (close) inbreeding due to limited population size which may have a negative effect on population viability, particularly when genetic load (decrease of the fitness of the average genotype relative to the fittest genotype) is high. However, even when the genetic load is high effects of inbreeding depression on population viability may be limited or even non-existent. Although a high genetic load can strongly increase local extinction risk, it does not necessarily result in a reduced population growth rate.

It has been argued that in many cases the deleterious alleles responsible for inbreeding depression and genetic load have a limited impact at the population level because of density-dependent processes. Consequently, population size and persistence often do not seem to be affected by the presence of deleterious alleles, even when they are clearly expressed, as shown by e.g. low survival, low reproductive rate, and increased susceptibility to pathogens. Alternatively, deleterious alleles may be epigenetically suppressed. Epigenetic regulation may limit the impact of low genetic diversity on population viability by increasing phenotypic variation. However, the absence of a clear impact of genetic load and inbreeding on population viability may also be (partly) a consequence of underreporting. To date, there are still only a few case studies assessing the magnitude of genetic load and inbreeding depression in the wild, let alone linking this to population viability.

In this Research Topic, we welcome studies on the relationship between neutral diversity, functional diversity, and deleterious alleles on the one hand and inbreeding depression, individual fitness, genetic load, epigenetic regulation and population viability on the other. In particular, we would like to address the following three questions:

1) Under what circumstances does inbreeding result in decreased population viability?
2) Why are some populations stable, or even thriving, despite high inbreeding?
3) What is the role of epigenetic regulation in (suppressing) inbreeding depression and population viability?


Keywords: Inbreeding Depression, Genetic Load, Deleterious Alleles, Population Viability


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 November 2021 Abstract
28 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 November 2021 Abstract
28 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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