Research Topic

Fabrication and Application of Solid State Detectors

About this Research Topic

The first solid-state detectors, mostly based on single Germanium or Silicon diodes, were introduced in the early 60s as spectroscopy detectors for x-rays and nuclear physics applications. Since the early days, they were considered promising for the very high energy resolution and linearity also in comparison with scintillators. In the early 80s these detectors started to be used in high energy physics, thanks to the improvement in fabrication techniques that allowed multiple detector structures (like strips or pixels) in single silicon crystals allowing sub-millimetric position resolution. At the same time new materials, like GaAs, CdTe and also mono- and polycrystalline diamonds, started to be used in the fabrication of solid-state radiation detectors. During the following years, progresses and innovation continued in all directions: a) new detector geometries and charge collecting techniques like drift detectors, CCDs, avalanche detectors, 3D detectors etc.; b) new materials alternative to crystalline Silicon: like SiC, HgI2, CZT, Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon (a-Si:H), organic materials, perovskite etc.; c) new applications in particle physics d) application in other fields of physics like astrophysics and astroparticle physics, medical physics (medical dosimetry), accelerator physics (beam flux measurement), homeland security etc. In this Research Topic we would like to explore relevant and new aspects of solid-state detectors not using crystalline silicon as detection material.

The present article collection would like to present a wide view of the different fabrication techniques, detector design, new materials, performances and applications of solid-state detectors alternative to crystalline silicon ones. For example, organic semiconductor and perovskite are very promising new materials for dosimetry, SiC for detection of single particles and nuclei while diamond and a-Si:H detectors for both dosimetry and single particle detection. Emerging application for these materials are x-ray detection and dosimetry for medical and industrial imaging, dosimetry and particle detection in space applications, beam flux measurements, particle detection as alternative to silicon detectors in nuclear and particle physics, neutron detection for reactors and homeland security. A special interest will be also dedicated to fabrication techniques of solid-state detectors and to recent developments in readout electronics.

We welcome both original research and reviews devoted to new results and applications, from within (but not limited to) the following areas:
• Solid state detectors for dosimetry applications;
• Solid state detectors for astroparticle physics in space;
• Solid state detectors for timing, calorimetry and position sensitive detectors;
• Solid state drift detectors;
• Readout electronics for solid state detectors;
• X-ray and gamma ray detection with solid state detectors and its application in medicine and industry;
• Radiation damage in solid-state detectors;
• Nanofabrication techniques in solid state detectors.


Keywords: 3D - detectors, Dosimetry, Nanofabrication, Semiconductors, Diamond detectors, Organic semiconductors, Perovskite detectors, Radiation damage, Front-end electronics


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The first solid-state detectors, mostly based on single Germanium or Silicon diodes, were introduced in the early 60s as spectroscopy detectors for x-rays and nuclear physics applications. Since the early days, they were considered promising for the very high energy resolution and linearity also in comparison with scintillators. In the early 80s these detectors started to be used in high energy physics, thanks to the improvement in fabrication techniques that allowed multiple detector structures (like strips or pixels) in single silicon crystals allowing sub-millimetric position resolution. At the same time new materials, like GaAs, CdTe and also mono- and polycrystalline diamonds, started to be used in the fabrication of solid-state radiation detectors. During the following years, progresses and innovation continued in all directions: a) new detector geometries and charge collecting techniques like drift detectors, CCDs, avalanche detectors, 3D detectors etc.; b) new materials alternative to crystalline Silicon: like SiC, HgI2, CZT, Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon (a-Si:H), organic materials, perovskite etc.; c) new applications in particle physics d) application in other fields of physics like astrophysics and astroparticle physics, medical physics (medical dosimetry), accelerator physics (beam flux measurement), homeland security etc. In this Research Topic we would like to explore relevant and new aspects of solid-state detectors not using crystalline silicon as detection material.

The present article collection would like to present a wide view of the different fabrication techniques, detector design, new materials, performances and applications of solid-state detectors alternative to crystalline silicon ones. For example, organic semiconductor and perovskite are very promising new materials for dosimetry, SiC for detection of single particles and nuclei while diamond and a-Si:H detectors for both dosimetry and single particle detection. Emerging application for these materials are x-ray detection and dosimetry for medical and industrial imaging, dosimetry and particle detection in space applications, beam flux measurements, particle detection as alternative to silicon detectors in nuclear and particle physics, neutron detection for reactors and homeland security. A special interest will be also dedicated to fabrication techniques of solid-state detectors and to recent developments in readout electronics.

We welcome both original research and reviews devoted to new results and applications, from within (but not limited to) the following areas:
• Solid state detectors for dosimetry applications;
• Solid state detectors for astroparticle physics in space;
• Solid state detectors for timing, calorimetry and position sensitive detectors;
• Solid state drift detectors;
• Readout electronics for solid state detectors;
• X-ray and gamma ray detection with solid state detectors and its application in medicine and industry;
• Radiation damage in solid-state detectors;
• Nanofabrication techniques in solid state detectors.


Keywords: 3D - detectors, Dosimetry, Nanofabrication, Semiconductors, Diamond detectors, Organic semiconductors, Perovskite detectors, Radiation damage, Front-end electronics


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

22 October 2021 Abstract
21 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

22 October 2021 Abstract
21 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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