Research Topic

Myiasis: Ecology, Systematics and Global Distribution

About this Research Topic

In 1840, F. W. Hope introduced the term “myiasis” to indicate the disease caused by Diptera larvae infesting the human body. Later, this term was extended including also the same type of infestation that had all vertebrates as host. Presently, the generally accepted definition of myiasis is that by F. K. Zumpt, formulated in 1965 “as the infestation of live human and vertebrate animals with dipterous larvae, which, at least for a certain period, feed on the host’s dead or living tissue, liquid body-substances, or ingested food”. Myiasis involves the fact that the dipteran larva must complete at least a part of its normal development inside a vertebrate body. The main families of Diptera causing myasis are, for number of species and of reported cases, Calliphoridae, Oestridae and Sarcophagidae.

Multidisciplinary studies on incidence of myiasis and identification of the species causing this infestation may provide relevant information not only about biology and ecology of these parasites, but also about modifications of their distribution areas under the global effects of climate changes. Other relevant issues in studies on myiasis are epidemiology, risk factors and predisposing conditions. Investigations on these topics could be useful to provide suitable guidelines for veterinarians, entomologists and other scholars working in the field.

The studies that could be included in the Research Topic may deal with:
- New data acquired by multidisciplinary studies on cases of veterinary and medical myiasis
- Studies on systematics and biology of species causing myiasis and on the relationships between host and parasite species
- Studies on ecology and global distribution of species causing myiasis, also including the possible effects of climate change
- Multidisciplinary studies on epidemiology, risk factors and predisposing conditions of myiasis worldwide


Keywords: Myiasis, Globalization, Climate change, Human health, Animal Health, Systematics


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In 1840, F. W. Hope introduced the term “myiasis” to indicate the disease caused by Diptera larvae infesting the human body. Later, this term was extended including also the same type of infestation that had all vertebrates as host. Presently, the generally accepted definition of myiasis is that by F. K. Zumpt, formulated in 1965 “as the infestation of live human and vertebrate animals with dipterous larvae, which, at least for a certain period, feed on the host’s dead or living tissue, liquid body-substances, or ingested food”. Myiasis involves the fact that the dipteran larva must complete at least a part of its normal development inside a vertebrate body. The main families of Diptera causing myasis are, for number of species and of reported cases, Calliphoridae, Oestridae and Sarcophagidae.

Multidisciplinary studies on incidence of myiasis and identification of the species causing this infestation may provide relevant information not only about biology and ecology of these parasites, but also about modifications of their distribution areas under the global effects of climate changes. Other relevant issues in studies on myiasis are epidemiology, risk factors and predisposing conditions. Investigations on these topics could be useful to provide suitable guidelines for veterinarians, entomologists and other scholars working in the field.

The studies that could be included in the Research Topic may deal with:
- New data acquired by multidisciplinary studies on cases of veterinary and medical myiasis
- Studies on systematics and biology of species causing myiasis and on the relationships between host and parasite species
- Studies on ecology and global distribution of species causing myiasis, also including the possible effects of climate change
- Multidisciplinary studies on epidemiology, risk factors and predisposing conditions of myiasis worldwide


Keywords: Myiasis, Globalization, Climate change, Human health, Animal Health, Systematics


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 December 2021 Abstract
30 June 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 December 2021 Abstract
30 June 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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