Research Topic

Obesity, Inflammation and Autoimmunity

About this Research Topic

The worldwide burden of obesity continues to rise, increasing the prevalence of various conditions, including insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Adipose expansion in obesity leads to adipokine and cytokine imbalances and a shift to a proinflammatory milieu within the adipose tissue. The obese adipose contributes to a systemic low grade inflammatory state characterized by abnormal activation of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. In parallel with the global obesity epidemic, the diagnosis of autoimmune and immune-mediated diseases has increased over the last several decades. While it is increasingly well recognized that the aberrant immune system activation present in obesity can contribute to the pathophysiology of chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, many questions remain regarding the link between obesity-associated inflammation and autoimmunity.

The goal of this research topic is to explore novel concepts related to obesity and the development of inflammatory diseases and autoimmunity. Many clinical studies have identified a correlation between obesity and the prevalence of autoimmunity, or between obesity and the severity of disease pathology or activity. However, there are comparatively few studies that have identified mechanistic links between obesity and related chronic diseases and autoimmune pathogenesis.

This Research Topic is designed to highlight studies and concepts related to obesity and related chronic diseases and its impact on inflammation and the development of autoimmunity. The Topic will ​include original research and review articles that focus on the following areas:
1. The mechanisms by which obesity and adipose tissue contribute to the development of systemic inflammation and immune system activation.
2. Adipokines in obesity and their contribution to the development of inflammation and autoimmunity, including their effects on immune cell function.
3. Crosstalk between obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, the gut microbiome, inflammation, and autoimmunity.
4. Therapeutics that target inflammation in obesity and related chronic diseases.


Keywords: diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity, adipose tissue, adipokines, autoimmunity, immune system, inflammation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The worldwide burden of obesity continues to rise, increasing the prevalence of various conditions, including insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Adipose expansion in obesity leads to adipokine and cytokine imbalances and a shift to a proinflammatory milieu within the adipose tissue. The obese adipose contributes to a systemic low grade inflammatory state characterized by abnormal activation of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. In parallel with the global obesity epidemic, the diagnosis of autoimmune and immune-mediated diseases has increased over the last several decades. While it is increasingly well recognized that the aberrant immune system activation present in obesity can contribute to the pathophysiology of chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, many questions remain regarding the link between obesity-associated inflammation and autoimmunity.

The goal of this research topic is to explore novel concepts related to obesity and the development of inflammatory diseases and autoimmunity. Many clinical studies have identified a correlation between obesity and the prevalence of autoimmunity, or between obesity and the severity of disease pathology or activity. However, there are comparatively few studies that have identified mechanistic links between obesity and related chronic diseases and autoimmune pathogenesis.

This Research Topic is designed to highlight studies and concepts related to obesity and related chronic diseases and its impact on inflammation and the development of autoimmunity. The Topic will ​include original research and review articles that focus on the following areas:
1. The mechanisms by which obesity and adipose tissue contribute to the development of systemic inflammation and immune system activation.
2. Adipokines in obesity and their contribution to the development of inflammation and autoimmunity, including their effects on immune cell function.
3. Crosstalk between obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, the gut microbiome, inflammation, and autoimmunity.
4. Therapeutics that target inflammation in obesity and related chronic diseases.


Keywords: diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity, adipose tissue, adipokines, autoimmunity, immune system, inflammation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 September 2021 Abstract
31 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 September 2021 Abstract
31 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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