Research Topic

Role of lncRNA in Diabetic Nephropathy

About this Research Topic

Diabetes mellitus is the most prevalent chronic disease worldwide. Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a progressive kidney disease that develops as a microvascular consequence in Diabetic patients. Till now, the pathogenesis of DN is still not fully understood. Moreover, controlling blood glucose level and blood pressure are not enough to protect from potential kidney damage. Therefore, DN is a major underlying cause of chronic renal disease worldwide, accounting for about 40% of diagnosed end-stage renal failure. LnRNAs studies open up new prospects for prognosis, treatment, and diagnosis of DN. Increasing understating of DN in the direction of LnRNAs will help us better in early diagnosis and/or development of treatment strategies that can prevent renal injury in diabetic patients.

Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) comprise a large part of the human genome. Despite the lack of protein translation capacity, recent evidence has shown their crucial roles in various gene regulation processes for instance replication and transcription of DNA, translation, and splicing of RNA in addition to posttranslational modifications in the cytoplasm. Among various classes of ncRNA discovered, long noncoding RNA (LncRNAs) are a group of large ncRNAs consisting of more than 200 nucleotides that have recently captured biomedical researchers’ interest in the field of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Several clinical and preclinical studies reported altered LnRNAs levels in DN. Other studies linked LnRNAs to various pathogenic events in DN such as podocyte and tubular injury, microvascular disruption, hypertrophy, mesangial cell fibrosis, extracellular matrix accumulation, inflammation, oxidative stress, autophagy, apoptosis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and inflammation. Some LncRNAs have also been suggested as markers for the early diagnosis of DN.

This Research Topic welcomes submissions of original research articles and reviews that focus on updating our knowledge and expand our understanding of the role of lncRNAs in DN. Contributions on diagnostic and prognostic values of lncRNAs in DN will be also considered. Preclinical, clinical, and bioinformatics studies relevant to the field are welcome.


Keywords: Diabetic Nephropathy, LncRNA, Diagnostic, Therapeutic Target, Clinical, Experimental


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Diabetes mellitus is the most prevalent chronic disease worldwide. Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a progressive kidney disease that develops as a microvascular consequence in Diabetic patients. Till now, the pathogenesis of DN is still not fully understood. Moreover, controlling blood glucose level and blood pressure are not enough to protect from potential kidney damage. Therefore, DN is a major underlying cause of chronic renal disease worldwide, accounting for about 40% of diagnosed end-stage renal failure. LnRNAs studies open up new prospects for prognosis, treatment, and diagnosis of DN. Increasing understating of DN in the direction of LnRNAs will help us better in early diagnosis and/or development of treatment strategies that can prevent renal injury in diabetic patients.

Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) comprise a large part of the human genome. Despite the lack of protein translation capacity, recent evidence has shown their crucial roles in various gene regulation processes for instance replication and transcription of DNA, translation, and splicing of RNA in addition to posttranslational modifications in the cytoplasm. Among various classes of ncRNA discovered, long noncoding RNA (LncRNAs) are a group of large ncRNAs consisting of more than 200 nucleotides that have recently captured biomedical researchers’ interest in the field of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Several clinical and preclinical studies reported altered LnRNAs levels in DN. Other studies linked LnRNAs to various pathogenic events in DN such as podocyte and tubular injury, microvascular disruption, hypertrophy, mesangial cell fibrosis, extracellular matrix accumulation, inflammation, oxidative stress, autophagy, apoptosis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and inflammation. Some LncRNAs have also been suggested as markers for the early diagnosis of DN.

This Research Topic welcomes submissions of original research articles and reviews that focus on updating our knowledge and expand our understanding of the role of lncRNAs in DN. Contributions on diagnostic and prognostic values of lncRNAs in DN will be also considered. Preclinical, clinical, and bioinformatics studies relevant to the field are welcome.


Keywords: Diabetic Nephropathy, LncRNA, Diagnostic, Therapeutic Target, Clinical, Experimental


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

27 August 2021 Abstract
25 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

27 August 2021 Abstract
25 December 2021 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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