Research Topic

Basic and Applied Aerobiology

About this Research Topic

Aerobiology is defined as the study of particles of biologic origin that are passively transported by the air and the effects of such particles on living systems and on the environment. Aerobiology is a rapidly expanding inter-disciplinary scientific field. Many aerobiologists still use sampling equipment based on a design from the 1950s and analyse samples by light microscopy, which is labour intensive and extremely time consuming. A great deal of recent research has therefore focused on the development of automated detection and analysis technologies and other sophisticated analytical tools. One of the traditional goals of aerobiology is to measure and report quantities of airborne pollen and fungal spores as a service to allergy sufferers, and there continues to be advances in aerobiological modelling. The accuracy of such models is likely to improve further as large amounts of high resolution, real-time, aerobiological data from state-of-the-art monitoring systems become available. Aerobiology, a term first coined by Fred C. Meier in the 1930s, connects environmental, biological and medical sciences. The link between airborne pollen and allergy was first described by Charles H. Blackely in 1873. The allergens of airborne pollen and fungal spores are now considered major causes of allergy worldwide, significantly impairing the quality of life of the allergic population and incurring high socio-economic costs. It is therefore important to routinely monitor the ambient air with the aim of increasing our understanding of spatial and temporal variations in these aeroallergens. For example, there are many low- and middle-income countries where our knowledge about aeroallergens is sparse because very little aerobiological monitoring has been conducted. It is also important to investigate the impacts of environmental pollutants in ambient air such as nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulphur dioxide and airborne particulate matter that are associated with the development or exacerbation of allergic disease. There is also the impact of climate change to consider and the risks posed by invasive species, thunderstorms, emerging allergic diseases and cross-reactivities. The goal of this Research Topic is to increase our understanding of particles of biological origin in the air through basic and applied aerobiological research.

The Editors of the Research Topic welcome submissions of Reviews, Original Research, Brief Research Reports and Methods. Papers that employ innovative methods and contain results that notably expand current aerobiological knowledge are encouraged. The Research Topic includes, but is not limited to, the following subjects:

•Monitoring airborne biological particles, from routine sampling and analysis to the current state-of-the-art
•Quality Control and Quality Assurance of aerobiological data
•Modelling and forecasting atmospheric concentrations of allergenic pollen and fungal spores
•Mapping sources of allergenic pollen and fungal spores
•Release, dispersal and atmospheric transport of aeroallergens
•Changes in the phenology of wind pollinated plants and allergenic fungi
•Cross-reactivity of aeroallergens
•Airborne allergens and air pollution
•Thunderstorm asthma


Keywords: Fungal spores, Pollen, Allergy, Phenology, Atmospheric Transport


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Aerobiology is defined as the study of particles of biologic origin that are passively transported by the air and the effects of such particles on living systems and on the environment. Aerobiology is a rapidly expanding inter-disciplinary scientific field. Many aerobiologists still use sampling equipment based on a design from the 1950s and analyse samples by light microscopy, which is labour intensive and extremely time consuming. A great deal of recent research has therefore focused on the development of automated detection and analysis technologies and other sophisticated analytical tools. One of the traditional goals of aerobiology is to measure and report quantities of airborne pollen and fungal spores as a service to allergy sufferers, and there continues to be advances in aerobiological modelling. The accuracy of such models is likely to improve further as large amounts of high resolution, real-time, aerobiological data from state-of-the-art monitoring systems become available. Aerobiology, a term first coined by Fred C. Meier in the 1930s, connects environmental, biological and medical sciences. The link between airborne pollen and allergy was first described by Charles H. Blackely in 1873. The allergens of airborne pollen and fungal spores are now considered major causes of allergy worldwide, significantly impairing the quality of life of the allergic population and incurring high socio-economic costs. It is therefore important to routinely monitor the ambient air with the aim of increasing our understanding of spatial and temporal variations in these aeroallergens. For example, there are many low- and middle-income countries where our knowledge about aeroallergens is sparse because very little aerobiological monitoring has been conducted. It is also important to investigate the impacts of environmental pollutants in ambient air such as nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulphur dioxide and airborne particulate matter that are associated with the development or exacerbation of allergic disease. There is also the impact of climate change to consider and the risks posed by invasive species, thunderstorms, emerging allergic diseases and cross-reactivities. The goal of this Research Topic is to increase our understanding of particles of biological origin in the air through basic and applied aerobiological research.

The Editors of the Research Topic welcome submissions of Reviews, Original Research, Brief Research Reports and Methods. Papers that employ innovative methods and contain results that notably expand current aerobiological knowledge are encouraged. The Research Topic includes, but is not limited to, the following subjects:

•Monitoring airborne biological particles, from routine sampling and analysis to the current state-of-the-art
•Quality Control and Quality Assurance of aerobiological data
•Modelling and forecasting atmospheric concentrations of allergenic pollen and fungal spores
•Mapping sources of allergenic pollen and fungal spores
•Release, dispersal and atmospheric transport of aeroallergens
•Changes in the phenology of wind pollinated plants and allergenic fungi
•Cross-reactivity of aeroallergens
•Airborne allergens and air pollution
•Thunderstorm asthma


Keywords: Fungal spores, Pollen, Allergy, Phenology, Atmospheric Transport


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

04 September 2021 Abstract
16 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

04 September 2021 Abstract
16 January 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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