Research Topic

Enclaves in Granitoids and its Petrogenetic and Geodynamic Significance

About this Research Topic

Granitoids may contain any type of lithic inclusions or fragments, which are referred to as enclave. During the past few decades, diverse nature and origin of enclaves hosted in granitoids have been described based on field, laboratory and experimental investigations. Current interpretations of enclaves in granitoids have found that they may represent: (1) xenolith as a solid fragment of country rocks mostly confined to the margins of pluton or may represent enroute deeper-derived lithology or unmelted source material, (2) surmicaceous enclave as segregation of refractory source materials (restite) left after partial melting, (3) cognate (autolith) as early-crystallized fine grains of cumulus phases or segregation of mafic clots or fragments of border rocks of host felsic magma itself, or fragments of forerunner mafic magma solidified at the margin of the conduit and later excavated by felsic magma, (4) microgranular enclaves representing felsic, mafic and mafic-felsic (intermediate) hybridized magma globules entrained and mingled into relatively cooler felsic host magma, and (5) fragments of synplutonic (synmagmatic) mafic to hybrid dyke magma intruded into crystallizing felsic magma chamber mostly at late stages of its evolution. These dykes may disrupt to form brecciated microgranular enclaves.
Enclaves bear petrographic, mineralogical, and elemental and isotopic evidence relevant to one or more processes stated above. They provide insights on the dynamics of magma chambers, and can be used to understand granitoid petrogenesis and crustal evolution.

The origin and evolution of enclaves are still being debated. In this Research Topic we hope to address the scientific issues related to physico-chemical conditions, magma chamber processes, sources and timing of enclave-granitoid magma evolution in the subduction to collision tectonic environments, and their global correlations.

We welcome contributions from researchers on granitoids and enclaves to enhance the knowledge on enclave-granitoid petrogenesis covering the following aspects on enclaves and host granitoids that may ultimately lead to settle the petrogenetic and geodynamic issues:

• Field relations;
• Meso- and micro-structures;
• Quantitative textural analysis;
• Phase petrology;
• Elemental and isotope geochemistry;
• Qualitative and quantitative modeling of processes;
• Experimental investigations.


Keywords: enclaves, typology, granitoids, petrogenesis, geodynamics


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Granitoids may contain any type of lithic inclusions or fragments, which are referred to as enclave. During the past few decades, diverse nature and origin of enclaves hosted in granitoids have been described based on field, laboratory and experimental investigations. Current interpretations of enclaves in granitoids have found that they may represent: (1) xenolith as a solid fragment of country rocks mostly confined to the margins of pluton or may represent enroute deeper-derived lithology or unmelted source material, (2) surmicaceous enclave as segregation of refractory source materials (restite) left after partial melting, (3) cognate (autolith) as early-crystallized fine grains of cumulus phases or segregation of mafic clots or fragments of border rocks of host felsic magma itself, or fragments of forerunner mafic magma solidified at the margin of the conduit and later excavated by felsic magma, (4) microgranular enclaves representing felsic, mafic and mafic-felsic (intermediate) hybridized magma globules entrained and mingled into relatively cooler felsic host magma, and (5) fragments of synplutonic (synmagmatic) mafic to hybrid dyke magma intruded into crystallizing felsic magma chamber mostly at late stages of its evolution. These dykes may disrupt to form brecciated microgranular enclaves.
Enclaves bear petrographic, mineralogical, and elemental and isotopic evidence relevant to one or more processes stated above. They provide insights on the dynamics of magma chambers, and can be used to understand granitoid petrogenesis and crustal evolution.

The origin and evolution of enclaves are still being debated. In this Research Topic we hope to address the scientific issues related to physico-chemical conditions, magma chamber processes, sources and timing of enclave-granitoid magma evolution in the subduction to collision tectonic environments, and their global correlations.

We welcome contributions from researchers on granitoids and enclaves to enhance the knowledge on enclave-granitoid petrogenesis covering the following aspects on enclaves and host granitoids that may ultimately lead to settle the petrogenetic and geodynamic issues:

• Field relations;
• Meso- and micro-structures;
• Quantitative textural analysis;
• Phase petrology;
• Elemental and isotope geochemistry;
• Qualitative and quantitative modeling of processes;
• Experimental investigations.


Keywords: enclaves, typology, granitoids, petrogenesis, geodynamics


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

10 October 2021 Abstract
13 March 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

10 October 2021 Abstract
13 March 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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