Research Topic

Immune Molecules and Cells in Neurodevelopment and Related Disorders

About this Research Topic

Recently, the relationship between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS) has attracted more attention from both neuroscientists and immunologists, with accumulating evidence that those two physiological systems regulate each other by a mutual interaction. A large number of proteins that were first described by immunologists have since been found important in the healthy and uninfected brains, raising the possibility that these proteins have pleiotropic functions in nervous system. Indeed, increasing evidence indicates that several immune proteins have novel, nonimmune functions in the brain. Among these are, proteins of both innate and adaptive immune system, proinflammatory cytokines, etc. Similarly, several other proteins that were first discovered in the nervous system have been found to have immunological functions.

During development, or under certain pathological conditions, the crosstalk between nervous and immune system can go beyond physiological control, resulting in a proinflammatory response of the CNS-resident immune cells that might initiate and promote the progression of severe tissue damage. In this Research Topic, we are interested in the impact of the immune system on nervous system development and related disorders, immune proteins and cells, and their roles in neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, and so on.

The aim of this Research Topic is to cover the recent progress in the field of specific immune proteins/cells that are required for normal brain development and neuronal function. We welcome Original Research and Review related, but are not limited to the following areas:
- The roles of immune molecules in neurodevelopment and related disorders;
- The roles of immune cells (brain-resident or peripheral) in neurodevelopment and related disorders;
- Mechanistic studies relating to the research topic;
- Therapeutic strategies include but not limited to gene therapy, ASO, RNAi, small molecules, etc.


Keywords: Immune proteins, immune cells, microglia, neurodevelopment, neurodevelopmental disorders


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recently, the relationship between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS) has attracted more attention from both neuroscientists and immunologists, with accumulating evidence that those two physiological systems regulate each other by a mutual interaction. A large number of proteins that were first described by immunologists have since been found important in the healthy and uninfected brains, raising the possibility that these proteins have pleiotropic functions in nervous system. Indeed, increasing evidence indicates that several immune proteins have novel, nonimmune functions in the brain. Among these are, proteins of both innate and adaptive immune system, proinflammatory cytokines, etc. Similarly, several other proteins that were first discovered in the nervous system have been found to have immunological functions.

During development, or under certain pathological conditions, the crosstalk between nervous and immune system can go beyond physiological control, resulting in a proinflammatory response of the CNS-resident immune cells that might initiate and promote the progression of severe tissue damage. In this Research Topic, we are interested in the impact of the immune system on nervous system development and related disorders, immune proteins and cells, and their roles in neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, and so on.

The aim of this Research Topic is to cover the recent progress in the field of specific immune proteins/cells that are required for normal brain development and neuronal function. We welcome Original Research and Review related, but are not limited to the following areas:
- The roles of immune molecules in neurodevelopment and related disorders;
- The roles of immune cells (brain-resident or peripheral) in neurodevelopment and related disorders;
- Mechanistic studies relating to the research topic;
- Therapeutic strategies include but not limited to gene therapy, ASO, RNAi, small molecules, etc.


Keywords: Immune proteins, immune cells, microglia, neurodevelopment, neurodevelopmental disorders


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

09 January 2022 Manuscript
08 February 2022 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

09 January 2022 Manuscript
08 February 2022 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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