Research Topic

Environmental Heavy Metal Exposure and Osteoporosis: Basic and Population Research

About this Research Topic

Osteoporosis continues to be a critical public health concern worldwide, estimated that 22 million women and 5.5 million men in the EU are affected. Environmental factors have been found to play an important role in the occurrence of osteoporosis and there are concerns that environmental heavy metal exposure is one of these factors. Heavy metals are naturally occurring, however, industrial, domestic, agricultural, and technological activities may lead to additional environmental contamination. Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury are the several primary metals that have been found to have a negative effect on human health. Exposure to these heavy metals is known to induce multiple organ damage, leading to complications including cardiovascular disease, liver disease, and renal dysfunction. Cadmium or lead exposure specifically has been linked to bone damage, such as osteoporosis and bone fractures, in epidemiological and experimental studies that often have a cross-sectional design. As longitudinal studies are rarely reported, the link between heavy metals and bone damage requires further research to fully understand the long-term effects, the health impact of mixed-exposure, and the adverse effects on children and adolescents. Possible cellular and molecular mechanisms also require further investigation.

Health concerns caused by heavy metal exposure are on the rise and must be addressed to fully understand the link to osteoporosis. This Research Topic focuses on bridging the gap of knowledge on the impacts of heavy metal exposure on bone health. We hope this Research Topic can provide novel knowledge to understand the impacts and mechanisms of heavy metal exposure on bone health.

We welcome the submissions of Original Research, Short Communication, Review, meta-analysis, and Mini Review. Both population and experimental research are welcomed. The subtopics of interests include but are not limited to:
• Heavy metal exposure and osteoporosis;
• Heavy metal exposure and bone metabolic biomarkers;
• Longitudinal studies to show exposure to heavy metals and bone health;
•The effects of heavy metal exposure on specific populations, such as children, adolescents, or other susceptible populations, and the link to bone damage and osteoporosis;
• Mixed-exposure and bone health;
• Early-life exposure and bone health;
• Cellular and molecular mechanisms of bone damage and osteoporosis.


Keywords: Environmental exposure, heavy metal, bone, osteoporosis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Osteoporosis continues to be a critical public health concern worldwide, estimated that 22 million women and 5.5 million men in the EU are affected. Environmental factors have been found to play an important role in the occurrence of osteoporosis and there are concerns that environmental heavy metal exposure is one of these factors. Heavy metals are naturally occurring, however, industrial, domestic, agricultural, and technological activities may lead to additional environmental contamination. Arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury are the several primary metals that have been found to have a negative effect on human health. Exposure to these heavy metals is known to induce multiple organ damage, leading to complications including cardiovascular disease, liver disease, and renal dysfunction. Cadmium or lead exposure specifically has been linked to bone damage, such as osteoporosis and bone fractures, in epidemiological and experimental studies that often have a cross-sectional design. As longitudinal studies are rarely reported, the link between heavy metals and bone damage requires further research to fully understand the long-term effects, the health impact of mixed-exposure, and the adverse effects on children and adolescents. Possible cellular and molecular mechanisms also require further investigation.

Health concerns caused by heavy metal exposure are on the rise and must be addressed to fully understand the link to osteoporosis. This Research Topic focuses on bridging the gap of knowledge on the impacts of heavy metal exposure on bone health. We hope this Research Topic can provide novel knowledge to understand the impacts and mechanisms of heavy metal exposure on bone health.

We welcome the submissions of Original Research, Short Communication, Review, meta-analysis, and Mini Review. Both population and experimental research are welcomed. The subtopics of interests include but are not limited to:
• Heavy metal exposure and osteoporosis;
• Heavy metal exposure and bone metabolic biomarkers;
• Longitudinal studies to show exposure to heavy metals and bone health;
•The effects of heavy metal exposure on specific populations, such as children, adolescents, or other susceptible populations, and the link to bone damage and osteoporosis;
• Mixed-exposure and bone health;
• Early-life exposure and bone health;
• Cellular and molecular mechanisms of bone damage and osteoporosis.


Keywords: Environmental exposure, heavy metal, bone, osteoporosis


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

05 November 2021 Abstract
05 March 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

05 November 2021 Abstract
05 March 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..