About this Research Topic

Manuscript Submission Deadline 31 March 2022
Manuscript Extension Submission Deadline 15 April 2022

In the last five decades, Islamic fundamentalism has affected social, political, and economic developments in many parts of the world, from the US and Europe to Africa, Australia, and Asia, specifically, Western Asia. The emergence of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, popularly known as ‘ISIL’, not only had tragic consequences for people living in Syria and Iraq but also aroused global consternation. Recently, the Taliban’s rapid taking over of Afghanistan has jeopardized Afghan civil society’s relative achievements made in the past 20 years, including women’s social and educational advancements and the presence of a, now erstwhile, ethnically inclusive government.
Despite the Taliban’s rebranding efforts, global acceptance of and engagement with a group widely known for terrorism and brutal violence as a "legitimate" government is complicated, a relatively new phenomenon with various cultural and socio-political implications, and calls for further research and exploration. While this Research Topic is open to the studies of Islamic fundamentalism broadly, it will put particular emphasis on the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan as a case to illuminate the theoretical and empirical caveats concerning the socio-cultural and socio-political impacts of fundamentalist ideologies.

This Research Topic is planned to coincide with the ongoing political developments in Afghanistan, and the emergence and re-emergence of Islamic fundamentalism throughout the world. We invite submissions on a broad range of topics related to the communication of Islamic fundamentalism. We encourage submissions and commentary from multiple disciplinary perspectives including cultural and media/communication studies, sociology, political science, human rights, and other relevant fields, especially in relation (but not limited) to one or some of the following topics:

1. Fundamentalist Islam and less advantaged gender, sex, religious and ethnic groups;
2. Mediated representations of Islamic fundamentalism;
3. Conceptualisation of outgroups, terrorism and Jihad through the Islamic fundamentalist lens (ways in which fundamentalist groups represent outgroups and the meaning of Jihad and terrorism);
4. The evolution of Islamic fundamentalism through socio-cultural and technological changes;
5. Interculturality and Islamic fundamentalism;
6. Theorisation of Islamic fundamentalism in the literature of culture, communication, and media studies;
7. Islamic fundamentalism’s media, from print to social media;
8. Cultural impacts of the Taliban's taking over of Afghanistan, locally and globally;
10. Islamic fundamentalism and education;
11. The idea of nation-states and national identity in Islamic fundamentalist communication
This Research Topic is published on the International Day to Protect Education from Attacks, in order to give our field's contribution to the protection of inclusive and equitable quality education at all levels to all learners, especially those in vulnerable situations. It runs in parallel with the Research Topic "Protecting education at all costs? Education in times of crisis and conflict", published in Frontiers in Education on the same day.

Keywords: Islamic fundamentalism, Communication and Media, Terrorism, Culture, Identity


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In the last five decades, Islamic fundamentalism has affected social, political, and economic developments in many parts of the world, from the US and Europe to Africa, Australia, and Asia, specifically, Western Asia. The emergence of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, popularly known as ‘ISIL’, not only had tragic consequences for people living in Syria and Iraq but also aroused global consternation. Recently, the Taliban’s rapid taking over of Afghanistan has jeopardized Afghan civil society’s relative achievements made in the past 20 years, including women’s social and educational advancements and the presence of a, now erstwhile, ethnically inclusive government.
Despite the Taliban’s rebranding efforts, global acceptance of and engagement with a group widely known for terrorism and brutal violence as a "legitimate" government is complicated, a relatively new phenomenon with various cultural and socio-political implications, and calls for further research and exploration. While this Research Topic is open to the studies of Islamic fundamentalism broadly, it will put particular emphasis on the Taliban takeover of Afghanistan as a case to illuminate the theoretical and empirical caveats concerning the socio-cultural and socio-political impacts of fundamentalist ideologies.

This Research Topic is planned to coincide with the ongoing political developments in Afghanistan, and the emergence and re-emergence of Islamic fundamentalism throughout the world. We invite submissions on a broad range of topics related to the communication of Islamic fundamentalism. We encourage submissions and commentary from multiple disciplinary perspectives including cultural and media/communication studies, sociology, political science, human rights, and other relevant fields, especially in relation (but not limited) to one or some of the following topics:

1. Fundamentalist Islam and less advantaged gender, sex, religious and ethnic groups;
2. Mediated representations of Islamic fundamentalism;
3. Conceptualisation of outgroups, terrorism and Jihad through the Islamic fundamentalist lens (ways in which fundamentalist groups represent outgroups and the meaning of Jihad and terrorism);
4. The evolution of Islamic fundamentalism through socio-cultural and technological changes;
5. Interculturality and Islamic fundamentalism;
6. Theorisation of Islamic fundamentalism in the literature of culture, communication, and media studies;
7. Islamic fundamentalism’s media, from print to social media;
8. Cultural impacts of the Taliban's taking over of Afghanistan, locally and globally;
10. Islamic fundamentalism and education;
11. The idea of nation-states and national identity in Islamic fundamentalist communication
This Research Topic is published on the International Day to Protect Education from Attacks, in order to give our field's contribution to the protection of inclusive and equitable quality education at all levels to all learners, especially those in vulnerable situations. It runs in parallel with the Research Topic "Protecting education at all costs? Education in times of crisis and conflict", published in Frontiers in Education on the same day.

Keywords: Islamic fundamentalism, Communication and Media, Terrorism, Culture, Identity


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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