Research Topic

Mechanism and Treatment of Bone-cancer Pain

About this Research Topic

Cancer is the second most common cause of death in the United States and it is expected that about 500,000 people will have died of cancer every year. In many common advanced cancers including breast, prostate, kidney and lung, the tumors have a remarkable affinity to metastasize to bones such as the vertebrae, ribs, hip, femur, and tibia. Tumor metastasis to bone frequently results in pain, skeletal fractures, compression of the spinal cord, spinal instability, and decreased mobility. Similar to cancer, the factors that drive bone cancer pain evolve and change with disease progression. Once tumors metastasize to bone, they are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The research on the mechanism underlying bone cancer pain has begun to lead to advances in not only how we understand bone cancer pain but to the development of new therapies to treat bone cancer pain.



The goal of this special issue is to bring together investigators who study the underlying mechanisms and possible treatment of bone cancer pain. The aim is to provide an overview of bone cancer pain research in recent years (including research trends, hotspots, etc.), and to highlight neuroscience-oriented preclinical research of the mechanisms of bone cancer pain and clinical research, including epidemiology, diagnosis, prevention, management and future solutions of bone cancer pain. We encourage investigators to summarize the current opinions and research hotspots on this topic and to provide their own thoughts. We especially welcome researchers who present pre-clinical work of their innovative ideas about bone cancer pain and who can point towards potential therapy targets. Original research and review articles are both welcome.



Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

1. Bone cancer pain and tumor/immune cells – new insights into the role of tumor and immune cells in the occurrence and development of bone cancer pain.

2. Bone cancer pain and neurons – new ideas on mechanism of bone cancer pain in the peripheral and central systems, and the role of neuroinflammation in the development of bone cancer pain, including potential molecular therapy targets of bone cancer pain.

3. The role of glia cells in bone cancer pain, including but not limited to, the morphological and functional changes of glia cells during the development of bone cancer pain, functional interactions between glia cells and neurons, etc.

4. Analyzing the structure and function of neuronal circuits or micro circuits in bone cancer pain.

5. Bone cancer pain and recognition, including but not limited to, the interactive effects of bone cancer pain on depression, anxiety, and recognition, etc.

6. All types of clinical studies relating to the occurrence, development, prevention, and management of bone cancer pain, especially well-designed prospective randomized controlled trials.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Cancer is the second most common cause of death in the United States and it is expected that about 500,000 people will have died of cancer every year. In many common advanced cancers including breast, prostate, kidney and lung, the tumors have a remarkable affinity to metastasize to bones such as the vertebrae, ribs, hip, femur, and tibia. Tumor metastasis to bone frequently results in pain, skeletal fractures, compression of the spinal cord, spinal instability, and decreased mobility. Similar to cancer, the factors that drive bone cancer pain evolve and change with disease progression. Once tumors metastasize to bone, they are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The research on the mechanism underlying bone cancer pain has begun to lead to advances in not only how we understand bone cancer pain but to the development of new therapies to treat bone cancer pain.



The goal of this special issue is to bring together investigators who study the underlying mechanisms and possible treatment of bone cancer pain. The aim is to provide an overview of bone cancer pain research in recent years (including research trends, hotspots, etc.), and to highlight neuroscience-oriented preclinical research of the mechanisms of bone cancer pain and clinical research, including epidemiology, diagnosis, prevention, management and future solutions of bone cancer pain. We encourage investigators to summarize the current opinions and research hotspots on this topic and to provide their own thoughts. We especially welcome researchers who present pre-clinical work of their innovative ideas about bone cancer pain and who can point towards potential therapy targets. Original research and review articles are both welcome.



Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

1. Bone cancer pain and tumor/immune cells – new insights into the role of tumor and immune cells in the occurrence and development of bone cancer pain.

2. Bone cancer pain and neurons – new ideas on mechanism of bone cancer pain in the peripheral and central systems, and the role of neuroinflammation in the development of bone cancer pain, including potential molecular therapy targets of bone cancer pain.

3. The role of glia cells in bone cancer pain, including but not limited to, the morphological and functional changes of glia cells during the development of bone cancer pain, functional interactions between glia cells and neurons, etc.

4. Analyzing the structure and function of neuronal circuits or micro circuits in bone cancer pain.

5. Bone cancer pain and recognition, including but not limited to, the interactive effects of bone cancer pain on depression, anxiety, and recognition, etc.

6. All types of clinical studies relating to the occurrence, development, prevention, and management of bone cancer pain, especially well-designed prospective randomized controlled trials.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

21 November 2021 Abstract
21 March 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

21 November 2021 Abstract
21 March 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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