Research Topic

Soil Carbon and Nutrient Cycling under Changing Climates

About this Research Topic

Climate changes, such as global warming, elevated temperature and CO2, nitrogen deposition, and changes in weather patterns, are ongoing processes that have largely impacted our earth ecosystems and communities around the world. Soils store three times as much carbon as there is in the atmosphere or vegetation, and are the critical nutrient pools to sustain plant growth. Soil rich in organic matter, therefore, is the keystone element to soil health and food security and can boost soil resilience to environmental shifts. What will happen to these carbon and nutrient pools under climate change depends on the response of some key soil biogeochemical processes (e.g. C and nutrient cyclings), however, the magnitude and temporal and spatial patterns remain a mystery.



To restore soil health and increase adaption and resilience of ecosystems to climate change requires research into the effects of climate change on some key soil biogeochemical processes, such as C sequestration, nutrient cycling and availability, plant-soil interaction and soil microbial functions and the mechanisms controlling these processes. To better project climate change into the future, new research outputs and insights are welcome and would be implemented into the next generation of global carbon cycle models.



Manuscripts submitted to this research topic can have one of several formats: original research articles, perspectives, and reviews (systematic or meta-analyses). The research described in these manuscripts can be experimental (in laboratory or field settings) or be based on computer modelling. Of great interest is research that attempts to elucidate the complex physicochemical and biological processes that regulate the dynamics of carbon and nutrients in soils under different climatic factors and land management practices. Listed below, but not limited to, are specific themes of this research topic.



1. Soil C pools and sequestration in response to climate change

2. Biotic and abiotic mechanisms of C and nutrient dynamics under climate change

3. Soil-plant systematic management to adapt to climate change

4. Soil carbon/nutrient interacting with plants under climate change

5. Model-based global C and nutrient dynamics under climate change


Keywords: Climate change, soil organic carbon, soil nutrients, soil microbiota, biogeochemical processes


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Climate changes, such as global warming, elevated temperature and CO2, nitrogen deposition, and changes in weather patterns, are ongoing processes that have largely impacted our earth ecosystems and communities around the world. Soils store three times as much carbon as there is in the atmosphere or vegetation, and are the critical nutrient pools to sustain plant growth. Soil rich in organic matter, therefore, is the keystone element to soil health and food security and can boost soil resilience to environmental shifts. What will happen to these carbon and nutrient pools under climate change depends on the response of some key soil biogeochemical processes (e.g. C and nutrient cyclings), however, the magnitude and temporal and spatial patterns remain a mystery.



To restore soil health and increase adaption and resilience of ecosystems to climate change requires research into the effects of climate change on some key soil biogeochemical processes, such as C sequestration, nutrient cycling and availability, plant-soil interaction and soil microbial functions and the mechanisms controlling these processes. To better project climate change into the future, new research outputs and insights are welcome and would be implemented into the next generation of global carbon cycle models.



Manuscripts submitted to this research topic can have one of several formats: original research articles, perspectives, and reviews (systematic or meta-analyses). The research described in these manuscripts can be experimental (in laboratory or field settings) or be based on computer modelling. Of great interest is research that attempts to elucidate the complex physicochemical and biological processes that regulate the dynamics of carbon and nutrients in soils under different climatic factors and land management practices. Listed below, but not limited to, are specific themes of this research topic.



1. Soil C pools and sequestration in response to climate change

2. Biotic and abiotic mechanisms of C and nutrient dynamics under climate change

3. Soil-plant systematic management to adapt to climate change

4. Soil carbon/nutrient interacting with plants under climate change

5. Model-based global C and nutrient dynamics under climate change


Keywords: Climate change, soil organic carbon, soil nutrients, soil microbiota, biogeochemical processes


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

26 November 2021 Abstract
26 March 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

26 November 2021 Abstract
26 March 2022 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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