Research Topic

Redox Regulation in Skeletal Muscle Aging and Exercise

About this Research Topic

Skeletal muscle represents the largest organ of the human body and comprises about 40% of total body mass in humans. Even in people who ‘age well’, there is a noticeable loss of muscle strength and function that accelerates dramatically after the age of 60, a major factor in the reduction in life quality for ...

Skeletal muscle represents the largest organ of the human body and comprises about 40% of total body mass in humans. Even in people who ‘age well’, there is a noticeable loss of muscle strength and function that accelerates dramatically after the age of 60, a major factor in the reduction in life quality for the aging population. Skeletal muscle generates reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen (ROS/RNS) species in response to muscle contractions. The concentration and species of ROS/RNS generated can depend on the age and fitness of the individual, muscle fibre type and the intensity of the muscle contractions. ROS/RNS generate unique signaling cascades that are not only essential in skeletal muscle contraction and adaptation but also play a role in a wide array of cell processes including cell proliferation, protein synthesis/degradation, immune response and antioxidant defences. ROS/RNS generated by contractions are not blunt oxidation instruments involved in the non-specific oxidation of cellular components, they are involved in a co-ordinated local response that is tightly controlled at all levels from generation to detoxification. This topic would especially welcome contributions outlining novel techniques for the analysis of the redox regulation of proteins, transcriptions factors or miRNAs within skeletal muscle.

This topic is an opportunity to bring together a collection of recent advances in our understanding of redox regulation within skeletal muscle. Contributions detailing redox techniques applied to skeletal muscle or musculoskeletal models incorporating proteomics, genomics, metabolomics and imaging are especially welcome. A collection of integrated approaches for redox regulation in skeletal muscle would be unique, providing precise information on the generation of ROS/RNS species and identification of their specific molecular targets. Ultimately this would offer new insights into the role of redox regulation during skeletal muscle contractions and whether the redox response of aged muscle tissue retains the adaptability to respond to exercise. Contributors are encouraged to submit reviews, mini-reviews, perspectives, research articles and short communications.


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