Research Topic

Salicylic acid signaling networks

About this Research Topic

The small phenolic compound salicylic acid (SA) is critical for plant defense against broad spectrum of pathogens. SA is also involved in multi-layered defense responses, from pathogen-associated molecular pattern triggered basal defense, resistance gene-mediated defense, to systemic acquired resistance. ...

The small phenolic compound salicylic acid (SA) is critical for plant defense against broad spectrum of pathogens. SA is also involved in multi-layered defense responses, from pathogen-associated molecular pattern triggered basal defense, resistance gene-mediated defense, to systemic acquired resistance. Recent decades have witnessed tremendous progress towards our understanding of SA-mediated signaling networks. Many genes have been identified to have direct or indirect effect on SA biosynthesis or to regulate SA accumulation. Several SA receptors have been identified and characterization of these receptors has shed light on the mechanisms of SA-mediated defense signaling, which encompass chromosomal remodeling, DNA repair, epigenetics, to transcriptional reprogramming. SA does not act alone. It engages in crosstalk with other signaling pathways, such as those mediated by other phytohormones, in an agonistic or antagonistic manner, depending on hormones and pathosystems. Besides affecting plant innate immunity, SA has also been implicated in other cellular processes, such as flowering time determination, circadian clock control, and abiotic stress responses, possibly contributing to the regulation of plant development. The multifaceted function of SA makes it critically important to further identify genes involved in SA signaling networks, understand their modes of action, and delineate interactions among the components of SA signaling networks. In addition, genetic manipulation of genes involved in SA signaling networks has also provided a promising approach to enhance disease resistance in economically important plants.

In this research topic, we welcome you to submit reviews, perspective articles, original research articles, and method papers to highlight recent exciting progress on the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying SA-mediated defense and SA-crosstalk with other pathways as well as the application of the knowledge of SA defense to increase disease resistance in crop plants. Our research topic can be further subdivided as following:

1. SA biosynthesis and the regulation of SA accumulation.
2. SA signaling: from receptors to downstream signaling components.
3. SA crosstalk with hormone signaling pathways.
4. SA crosstalk with other cellular processes, such as those controlling flowering time and circadian rhythm.
5. Increase disease resistance by manipulation of SA signaling networks in crop plants.


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