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The construction sector, which uses cement in its activities, is well known for its release of CO2 into the atmosphere. Currently, this sector is more concerned and aware about reducing environmental pollution. In this context, pozzolanic materials from industrial, agricultural, and power-plant such as rice husk ash, fly ash, silica fume, palm oil-fuel ash, slag, coal bottom ash etc., can be seen as an alternative for sustainable materials, thereby contributing to a reduction in environmental pollution.

Pozzolans are different types of refractory materials; they are naturally available, and consist of very fine particles of siliceous and aluminous materials which, when in presence of water, react with Ca(OH)2 to form cementitious materials. Nowadays the use of pozzolanic materials in the production of concrete is accepted worldwide, and has increased over time, because it can enhance the performance of concrete. Numerous studies have been analyzing the application of pozzolanic materials, but research is still in progress.

Microcement is a polymer modified cement-based coating. It is essentially comprised of a rapid hardening cement, a fine filler such as calcium carbonate or fine quartz powder, fine aggregates, and an adhesive polymer, which can be applied thinly to walls, stairs, and floors, in both domestic and commercial environments. The microcement also stands out as a very durable material that does not crack (depending on the quality of the material and if it's being applied by a professional). The appearance of fissures, cracks, marks, and stains, a problem that mainly concerns the smoothed microcement, is usually due to failures in the fundamental steps in the microcement application. The usage of pozzolanic materials in the production of microcement is still limited and new findings should be explored and shared with the world.

The Research Topic aims to collate original research and review articles that report on the newest findings in microcement and pozzolanic materials in concrete. It will focus on producing safe and sustainable concrete, which can benefit society. Other topics such as economic (costs, savings) and environmental impacts (life cycle assessment) are also worth exploring to demonstrate the significant role of micro-cement and pozzolanic materials for sustainable development and circular economy for a resource-saving and environmentally friendly society. We welcome articles from industry and academia that convey advanced research in developing, designing or constructing schemes and papers on best practices that others can learn from and utilize. Furthermore, discussions/research on any normative restrictions, implementation in Codes and Standards in regard to applications and challenges are encouraged. Original research and review articles are welcome.

The themes for this topic include, but are not limited to:

• Cement manufacture and materials
• Interaction of pozzolanic materials with other materials
• Microcement with pozzolanic materials
• Engineering Properties and Durability of cementitious materials
• Analysis and testing of microcement and concrete with pozzolanic materials
• Hydration process of concrete
• Cements replacement materials and applications

Keywords: Pozzolanic materials, microcement, durability, hydration, sustainable concrete, sustainable material


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The construction sector, which uses cement in its activities, is well known for its release of CO2 into the atmosphere. Currently, this sector is more concerned and aware about reducing environmental pollution. In this context, pozzolanic materials from industrial, agricultural, and power-plant such as rice husk ash, fly ash, silica fume, palm oil-fuel ash, slag, coal bottom ash etc., can be seen as an alternative for sustainable materials, thereby contributing to a reduction in environmental pollution.

Pozzolans are different types of refractory materials; they are naturally available, and consist of very fine particles of siliceous and aluminous materials which, when in presence of water, react with Ca(OH)2 to form cementitious materials. Nowadays the use of pozzolanic materials in the production of concrete is accepted worldwide, and has increased over time, because it can enhance the performance of concrete. Numerous studies have been analyzing the application of pozzolanic materials, but research is still in progress.

Microcement is a polymer modified cement-based coating. It is essentially comprised of a rapid hardening cement, a fine filler such as calcium carbonate or fine quartz powder, fine aggregates, and an adhesive polymer, which can be applied thinly to walls, stairs, and floors, in both domestic and commercial environments. The microcement also stands out as a very durable material that does not crack (depending on the quality of the material and if it's being applied by a professional). The appearance of fissures, cracks, marks, and stains, a problem that mainly concerns the smoothed microcement, is usually due to failures in the fundamental steps in the microcement application. The usage of pozzolanic materials in the production of microcement is still limited and new findings should be explored and shared with the world.

The Research Topic aims to collate original research and review articles that report on the newest findings in microcement and pozzolanic materials in concrete. It will focus on producing safe and sustainable concrete, which can benefit society. Other topics such as economic (costs, savings) and environmental impacts (life cycle assessment) are also worth exploring to demonstrate the significant role of micro-cement and pozzolanic materials for sustainable development and circular economy for a resource-saving and environmentally friendly society. We welcome articles from industry and academia that convey advanced research in developing, designing or constructing schemes and papers on best practices that others can learn from and utilize. Furthermore, discussions/research on any normative restrictions, implementation in Codes and Standards in regard to applications and challenges are encouraged. Original research and review articles are welcome.

The themes for this topic include, but are not limited to:

• Cement manufacture and materials
• Interaction of pozzolanic materials with other materials
• Microcement with pozzolanic materials
• Engineering Properties and Durability of cementitious materials
• Analysis and testing of microcement and concrete with pozzolanic materials
• Hydration process of concrete
• Cements replacement materials and applications

Keywords: Pozzolanic materials, microcement, durability, hydration, sustainable concrete, sustainable material


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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