About this Research Topic

Manuscript Submission Deadline 29 April 2022
Manuscript Extension Submission Deadline 30 May 2022

Covid 19 pandemic plays a double role in disrupting the existing institutional system and bringing up more opportunities and innovations. Many studies, including the latest SDGs report (2021), have found that the Covid 19 pandemic positively impacted environmental sustainability (due to limited human activities) even though it was only short-term. Thus, it would be interesting to ask what we can do to extend the Covid experience into a more extensive social action and its positive impact on a whole range of sustainability with a holistic evolved system. Therefore, a further theoretical and practical question is how to effectively change the institutional approach to become a better one which can structure social interactions sustainably and serve our goal of sustainability.

The explanations for institutional change argue that institutional change is more endogenous and gradual. They indicate that the current economic and social institutions determine the next period's allocation of resources, and the cycle repeats. In the stream of the neo-institutional theorem, the opposite idea, "punctured equilibrium," argues that the institutional change comes from a sudden and exogenous shock. The Covid 19 pandemic has impacted institutional change, which can be negative or positive from exogenous and endogenous angles. Even though institutional change can be in five types of gradual transformation (exhaustion, drift, layering, displacement, and conversion), the mechanism of endogenous or exogenous induced institutional change or an integrative endogenous AND exogenous-induced institutional change hasn't yet been well explained. Therefore, a further essential question is how Covid 19 pandemic has become an exogenous shock to shake the institution. How shall we make better use of this shake to help institutions do endogenous change to serve sustainability better?

In addition, from the legal arm of institutional transformation perspective, under the shock of the Covid 19 pandemic, our Standard Rules Making System did not show its sufficiency to deal with the emergency on our plates. In principle, emergency measures are meant to ignore established and old rules but replaced by new rules for a unique situation. Without ranking any of the approaches adopted globally, we witnessed rulemaking by effective rationalists and fantasists. What seemed to be common in all jurisdictions was that the poor and marginalized members of society were among those most affected by the pandemic and the emergency rules implemented in response to the pandemic. When looking forward to sustainability, we should consider how to protect the fundamental human rights of the poor and marginalized groups in our society by embedding basic principles of participation, equality, non-discrimination, transparency, and accountability into the process of dealing with emergencies.

Accordingly, enlightened by the practice of the Covid-19 pandemic impact on all arms of institutional change, we welcome submissions that consider the following questions in the fields of sociology, geopolitics, legal, economic, and management, at international, national, organizational, or community level:

• What shall we do to extend the Covid experience into a more extensive social action and extend its positive impact on the whole range of sustainability?

• How shall we effectively adapt our institutions as a better integrative system of rules to structure social interactions to sustainability?

• How did Covid 19 pandemic, as an exogenous shock, shake the institutions? How shall we make better use of this shake to transform institutions to serve sustainability better?

• How shall we use the pandemic–induced institutional change to design a new institutional framework at various levels, providing realistic action for sustainability?

• Is there a fundamental flaw in the rules-based world that discriminates against the poor, marginalized, and vulnerable members? If so, how could it be remedied?

• How to empower the poor and marginalized groups in the "good times" (in between pandemics) and prepare them for their plight in the "bad times" (during a pandemic)?

• How to improve access to education, information, and justice for the poor and marginalized groups?

Keywords: Institutional Change, Sustainability, Integrative System, Pandemic, Policy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Covid 19 pandemic plays a double role in disrupting the existing institutional system and bringing up more opportunities and innovations. Many studies, including the latest SDGs report (2021), have found that the Covid 19 pandemic positively impacted environmental sustainability (due to limited human activities) even though it was only short-term. Thus, it would be interesting to ask what we can do to extend the Covid experience into a more extensive social action and its positive impact on a whole range of sustainability with a holistic evolved system. Therefore, a further theoretical and practical question is how to effectively change the institutional approach to become a better one which can structure social interactions sustainably and serve our goal of sustainability.

The explanations for institutional change argue that institutional change is more endogenous and gradual. They indicate that the current economic and social institutions determine the next period's allocation of resources, and the cycle repeats. In the stream of the neo-institutional theorem, the opposite idea, "punctured equilibrium," argues that the institutional change comes from a sudden and exogenous shock. The Covid 19 pandemic has impacted institutional change, which can be negative or positive from exogenous and endogenous angles. Even though institutional change can be in five types of gradual transformation (exhaustion, drift, layering, displacement, and conversion), the mechanism of endogenous or exogenous induced institutional change or an integrative endogenous AND exogenous-induced institutional change hasn't yet been well explained. Therefore, a further essential question is how Covid 19 pandemic has become an exogenous shock to shake the institution. How shall we make better use of this shake to help institutions do endogenous change to serve sustainability better?

In addition, from the legal arm of institutional transformation perspective, under the shock of the Covid 19 pandemic, our Standard Rules Making System did not show its sufficiency to deal with the emergency on our plates. In principle, emergency measures are meant to ignore established and old rules but replaced by new rules for a unique situation. Without ranking any of the approaches adopted globally, we witnessed rulemaking by effective rationalists and fantasists. What seemed to be common in all jurisdictions was that the poor and marginalized members of society were among those most affected by the pandemic and the emergency rules implemented in response to the pandemic. When looking forward to sustainability, we should consider how to protect the fundamental human rights of the poor and marginalized groups in our society by embedding basic principles of participation, equality, non-discrimination, transparency, and accountability into the process of dealing with emergencies.

Accordingly, enlightened by the practice of the Covid-19 pandemic impact on all arms of institutional change, we welcome submissions that consider the following questions in the fields of sociology, geopolitics, legal, economic, and management, at international, national, organizational, or community level:

• What shall we do to extend the Covid experience into a more extensive social action and extend its positive impact on the whole range of sustainability?

• How shall we effectively adapt our institutions as a better integrative system of rules to structure social interactions to sustainability?

• How did Covid 19 pandemic, as an exogenous shock, shake the institutions? How shall we make better use of this shake to transform institutions to serve sustainability better?

• How shall we use the pandemic–induced institutional change to design a new institutional framework at various levels, providing realistic action for sustainability?

• Is there a fundamental flaw in the rules-based world that discriminates against the poor, marginalized, and vulnerable members? If so, how could it be remedied?

• How to empower the poor and marginalized groups in the "good times" (in between pandemics) and prepare them for their plight in the "bad times" (during a pandemic)?

• How to improve access to education, information, and justice for the poor and marginalized groups?

Keywords: Institutional Change, Sustainability, Integrative System, Pandemic, Policy


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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