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Hypersomnolence includes excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and excessive need for sleep (ENS). EDS and ENS are frequent in the general population (5-15%) and symptom of many brain disorders. EDS/ ENS are lead symptoms of primary CNS hypersomnolence disorders, such as narcolepsy or idiopathic hypersomnia. These are rare disorders. Definitions and classification of hypersomnolence disorders are continuously discussed, also due to a lack of biomarkers for individual disorders. In the last decade, clinical trials focused on pharmacological treatment and narcolepsy. Larger studies addressing non-pharmacological aspect were rare. Further, clinical trials often focus on few standard outcome measures with limited meaningfulness for patients and clinical practice.

Several papers indicate that patients require additional non-pharmacological treatment options. We would like to summarize and present available and new evidence of “non-pharmacological strategies”. This also includes cognitive therapies, complementary medicine, diet, and other. Further, we would like to highlight potential new outcome measures for clinical trials and adequate patient-related outcome measures. Evidence for new clinical biomarkers will also be presented. In children, clinical features can be different from adults and also aspects like puberty, school, psychological development and impact on parents, and siblings need to be addressed. Care aspects like transition from childhood to adulthood and also workability are important, too. Finally, ethical aspects such as the use of placebo and management of disorders in low-developed countries have to be discussed.

This topic is highly patient and practice oriented and aims at summarizing available evidence, and discuss different aspects of hypersomnolence disorders. It also aims at a reframing of existing clinical study regimes and outcomes.

Thus, topic editors will welcome any types of manuscripts supported by the Journal – comprised of research article, brief research article, review, and mini-review – pertaining, but not limited to the following themes:

• Sleep neurobiology for the clinician (incl. transmitter systems)
• Non-pharmacological treatments
• Recent and future outcome measures (i.e. cognitive testing; objective vs subjective, impact of phenotypes) in clinical trials; clinical trials design (e.g. withdrawal trials); patient related outcome measures; clinical biomarkers
• Health care aspects (i.e. transition from child to adulthood; socio-economic aspects)
• Ethical aspects: the use of placebo; management in low-developed countries

Keywords: Hypersomnolence disorders, narcolepsy, idiopathic hypersomnia, clinical trials, management


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Hypersomnolence includes excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and excessive need for sleep (ENS). EDS and ENS are frequent in the general population (5-15%) and symptom of many brain disorders. EDS/ ENS are lead symptoms of primary CNS hypersomnolence disorders, such as narcolepsy or idiopathic hypersomnia. These are rare disorders. Definitions and classification of hypersomnolence disorders are continuously discussed, also due to a lack of biomarkers for individual disorders. In the last decade, clinical trials focused on pharmacological treatment and narcolepsy. Larger studies addressing non-pharmacological aspect were rare. Further, clinical trials often focus on few standard outcome measures with limited meaningfulness for patients and clinical practice.

Several papers indicate that patients require additional non-pharmacological treatment options. We would like to summarize and present available and new evidence of “non-pharmacological strategies”. This also includes cognitive therapies, complementary medicine, diet, and other. Further, we would like to highlight potential new outcome measures for clinical trials and adequate patient-related outcome measures. Evidence for new clinical biomarkers will also be presented. In children, clinical features can be different from adults and also aspects like puberty, school, psychological development and impact on parents, and siblings need to be addressed. Care aspects like transition from childhood to adulthood and also workability are important, too. Finally, ethical aspects such as the use of placebo and management of disorders in low-developed countries have to be discussed.

This topic is highly patient and practice oriented and aims at summarizing available evidence, and discuss different aspects of hypersomnolence disorders. It also aims at a reframing of existing clinical study regimes and outcomes.

Thus, topic editors will welcome any types of manuscripts supported by the Journal – comprised of research article, brief research article, review, and mini-review – pertaining, but not limited to the following themes:

• Sleep neurobiology for the clinician (incl. transmitter systems)
• Non-pharmacological treatments
• Recent and future outcome measures (i.e. cognitive testing; objective vs subjective, impact of phenotypes) in clinical trials; clinical trials design (e.g. withdrawal trials); patient related outcome measures; clinical biomarkers
• Health care aspects (i.e. transition from child to adulthood; socio-economic aspects)
• Ethical aspects: the use of placebo; management in low-developed countries

Keywords: Hypersomnolence disorders, narcolepsy, idiopathic hypersomnia, clinical trials, management


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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