About this Research Topic

Manuscript Submission Deadline 31 May 2022
Manuscript Extension Submission Deadline 30 September 2022

The multiplication of work platforms in many sectors of industry and services has profoundly changed the way in which workers' activity is conceived, organised and managed. The break with the principle of unity of time, workplace and action that characterised work in the Fordist era is obvious. Digitalisation disconnects work from the employment conceived as a "place in the organisation". In the absence of an organisational attachment, digital work is no longer materially circumscribed or even geographically located, but becomes 'diffuse' and is most often deployed in a network, mainly in the heart of the metropolitan area.
There is a very large literature today on the impact of digital technologies and algorithmic governance on workers' working conditions and pay. However, not enough research has been published on the way in which digital work is organised and regulated in the new spaces in which it takes place, whether these are public or domestic spaces. These spaces are grey areas. They form a common or shared habitat, where work on the one hand, and private, social and collective life on the other, interpenetrate and maintain relations between them that raise questions.
Can we speak of complementarity, opposition or hybridisation between these two worlds? How, within cities, does the activity of digitalized workers cohabit with the life, needs and activity of the resident population, particularly during the pandemic period when the use of digital platforms has been massive?

Mapping these new productive spaces; identifying the tensions and mediations between the 'work environment' and the 'living environment' within the metropolitan area; discussing the relevance of legal regulations but also of public policies for the integration of digital work in the metropolitan public space; understanding the impact of these socio-spatial mutations of work on the systems of industrials relations. These are the thematic axes that will guide this issue. The contributions will also be based on a wide range of geographical and sectoral case studies, from work platforms to logistics companies and large-scale distribution, where digital work represents a growing share of jobs.

Keywords: Platform; Work; Public Sphere, Industrial Relations


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The multiplication of work platforms in many sectors of industry and services has profoundly changed the way in which workers' activity is conceived, organised and managed. The break with the principle of unity of time, workplace and action that characterised work in the Fordist era is obvious. Digitalisation disconnects work from the employment conceived as a "place in the organisation". In the absence of an organisational attachment, digital work is no longer materially circumscribed or even geographically located, but becomes 'diffuse' and is most often deployed in a network, mainly in the heart of the metropolitan area.
There is a very large literature today on the impact of digital technologies and algorithmic governance on workers' working conditions and pay. However, not enough research has been published on the way in which digital work is organised and regulated in the new spaces in which it takes place, whether these are public or domestic spaces. These spaces are grey areas. They form a common or shared habitat, where work on the one hand, and private, social and collective life on the other, interpenetrate and maintain relations between them that raise questions.
Can we speak of complementarity, opposition or hybridisation between these two worlds? How, within cities, does the activity of digitalized workers cohabit with the life, needs and activity of the resident population, particularly during the pandemic period when the use of digital platforms has been massive?

Mapping these new productive spaces; identifying the tensions and mediations between the 'work environment' and the 'living environment' within the metropolitan area; discussing the relevance of legal regulations but also of public policies for the integration of digital work in the metropolitan public space; understanding the impact of these socio-spatial mutations of work on the systems of industrials relations. These are the thematic axes that will guide this issue. The contributions will also be based on a wide range of geographical and sectoral case studies, from work platforms to logistics companies and large-scale distribution, where digital work represents a growing share of jobs.

Keywords: Platform; Work; Public Sphere, Industrial Relations


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Topic Coordinators

Loading..

articles

Sort by:

Loading..

authors

Loading..

views

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Share on

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.