About this Research Topic

Abstract Submission Deadline 19 October 2022
Manuscript Submission Deadline 22 December 2022

Meeting our future global water needs is one of the most significant challenges in the 21st century. More than 800 million people lack access to drinking water due to scarcity, environmental contamination, and poor sanitation. Therefore, urgent remediation actions for contaminated water are necessary and required. Developing low-cost and eco-friendly materials for enhanced removal of regulated inorganic contaminants is highly sought after in water treatment. Besides, the generation of post-consumer and industrial waste is one of the leading environmental problems in the modern era, and its reduction and reuse, a challenge for the sustainable development of society.

The presence of micropollutants (organic and inorganic) in water is one of the major risks to human beings and environmental ecosystems due to their high toxicity and resistance to degradability. Most conventional wastewater treatment plants are not designed to remove micropollutants at low concentrations altogether. Therefore, upgrading these plants might reduce the discharge of these contaminants and improve water quality. Designing new and low-cost treatment technologies concerning the control and removal of micropollutants from aquatic environments is mandatory.

The development of cost-effective materials meant to reduce the energy penalty of existing processes and/or to have applications in environmental protection is a critical issue today. Various advanced functional solid materials having applications to environmental sustainability were pointed out as an auspicious material for trapping pollutants from the wastewater due to their outstanding features (e.g., large surface area, porosities, thermal stability, nanosized structure, and so on). Most of these materials can be tailored to selectively take up record quantities of different micropollutants in their pores.

Recently, comprehensive research that combines experimental study with a theoretical one to better describe the adsorption phenomenon has attracted a lot of interest. The theoretical study is based on the use of quantum chemical and molecular mechanic calculations to explain and support the experimental findings. The key assumption of this approach is that attained removal results in interfacial interactions between the target pollutant (e.g., molecule) and the surface of used support for elimination

This Research Topic welcomes research into recent prospects in both experimental and theoretical works on developing low-cost materials for the removal of organic and inorganic micropollutants from water. The developed low-cost materials may be in the following categories: 1) Industrial by-product; 2) Local minerals; 3) Biomass; 4) Synthetic Materials, and 5) any other materials not included elsewhere. Scientific papers combining theoretical and experimental approaches are highly endorsed. Articles with only an experimental or theoretical focus on the adsorption of contaminants are also targeted.

Keywords: Water treatment; Micropollutant; Adsorption mechanism; Heavy metals; Organic contaminants; Monte Carlo simulations; Quantum chemical calculations


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Meeting our future global water needs is one of the most significant challenges in the 21st century. More than 800 million people lack access to drinking water due to scarcity, environmental contamination, and poor sanitation. Therefore, urgent remediation actions for contaminated water are necessary and required. Developing low-cost and eco-friendly materials for enhanced removal of regulated inorganic contaminants is highly sought after in water treatment. Besides, the generation of post-consumer and industrial waste is one of the leading environmental problems in the modern era, and its reduction and reuse, a challenge for the sustainable development of society.

The presence of micropollutants (organic and inorganic) in water is one of the major risks to human beings and environmental ecosystems due to their high toxicity and resistance to degradability. Most conventional wastewater treatment plants are not designed to remove micropollutants at low concentrations altogether. Therefore, upgrading these plants might reduce the discharge of these contaminants and improve water quality. Designing new and low-cost treatment technologies concerning the control and removal of micropollutants from aquatic environments is mandatory.

The development of cost-effective materials meant to reduce the energy penalty of existing processes and/or to have applications in environmental protection is a critical issue today. Various advanced functional solid materials having applications to environmental sustainability were pointed out as an auspicious material for trapping pollutants from the wastewater due to their outstanding features (e.g., large surface area, porosities, thermal stability, nanosized structure, and so on). Most of these materials can be tailored to selectively take up record quantities of different micropollutants in their pores.

Recently, comprehensive research that combines experimental study with a theoretical one to better describe the adsorption phenomenon has attracted a lot of interest. The theoretical study is based on the use of quantum chemical and molecular mechanic calculations to explain and support the experimental findings. The key assumption of this approach is that attained removal results in interfacial interactions between the target pollutant (e.g., molecule) and the surface of used support for elimination

This Research Topic welcomes research into recent prospects in both experimental and theoretical works on developing low-cost materials for the removal of organic and inorganic micropollutants from water. The developed low-cost materials may be in the following categories: 1) Industrial by-product; 2) Local minerals; 3) Biomass; 4) Synthetic Materials, and 5) any other materials not included elsewhere. Scientific papers combining theoretical and experimental approaches are highly endorsed. Articles with only an experimental or theoretical focus on the adsorption of contaminants are also targeted.

Keywords: Water treatment; Micropollutant; Adsorption mechanism; Heavy metals; Organic contaminants; Monte Carlo simulations; Quantum chemical calculations


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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