Research Topic

Detection of circulating tumor DNA for early diagnosis of human cancers

  • Submission closed.

About this Research Topic

Human cancers have stereotype of being “incurable diseases”, as they are usually diagnosed at terminal stages when most therapies are inefficient. The biomarkers to identify cancers at early stages, particularly during ordinary blood examination, are of great demand. Certain promises have been previously ...

Human cancers have stereotype of being “incurable diseases”, as they are usually diagnosed at terminal stages when most therapies are inefficient. The biomarkers to identify cancers at early stages, particularly during ordinary blood examination, are of great demand. Certain promises have been previously installed on protein biomarkers (such as alpha-fetoprotein, carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 15-3 and prostate-specific antigen) in biological fluids; however, their use is limited due to lack of sufficient sensitivity, specificity, and stability. Recently, a number of studies have showed that tumour DNA can be efficiently detected in the blood plasma during various stages of cancer, what claims an amazing diagnostic potential of extracellular tumor DNA for the early diagnosis of oncological disorders. Various approaches to detect cancer-derived DNA in blood circulation have been investigated in the past. Those predominantly included either PCR amplification of DNA carrying hotspot mutations or customized tumour-specific qPCR assays (including break-point specific PCR). The targeted exome sequencing of cell-free DNA has been also shown to be a powerful tool for diagnosis and monitoring of metastatic cancers.

Indeed, unlike proteins, nucleic acids can be detected by PCR-based techniques via multimillion amplification of the signal and, therefore, the presence of as few as one DNA molecule in a given sample can be sufficient. Recently appeared molecular techniques, including massive parallel sequencing, digital PCR, ultrasensitive bisulfite sequencing and methylation arrays, enable characterization of cell-free tumor DNA in biological fluids. Apart from the early detection of cancer, promise of circulating tumor DNA for guiding therapeutic decisions in a variety of solid tumors for both clinical and investigative purposes is feasible.

This research topic is aimed to highlight the examples of cancer diagnosis and cancer management in human via detection of tumour-derived DNA in body fluids, and particularly, novel methodological approaches. These efforts will pave the way for the development of a non-invasive method that would enable us to overcome existing challenges to personalized medicine.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recent Articles

Loading..

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top