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Manuscript Submission Deadline 13 January 2023
Manuscript Extension Submission Deadline 12 February 2023

Purinergic neurotransmission involves the release of ATP as an efferent neurotransmitter and co-transmitter in the CNS. The concept of “purinergic transmission” led to the discovery of purinergic receptors which are divided into ionotropic P2X receptors (P2XRs) and metabotropic P2Y receptors (P2XYRs). To date, seven genes encoding P2XRs (P2X1-P2X7) and eight genes encoding P2YRs (P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6, P2Y11, P2Y12, P2Y13, P2Y14) have been discovered. In addition, the ionotropic P2XRs and G protein coupled P2YRs for nucleosides and nucleotides are widely expressed in multiple cell types (neurons, microglia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and Schwann cells) in the brain and spinal cord, mediating various aspects of neurotransmission (neurotransmitter release, regulation of synaptic currents), neuromodulation, and death. Purinergic signaling regulates physiological functions as learning and memory, locomotor activity, reward behavior, emotional responses, socio-communication, feeding and nociception. This diverse role of purinergic signaling in CNS physiology has identified the relevance and the importance of purinergic receptors to multiple diseased states of the CNS, including ischemia, epilepsy, neurodegenerative disorders, schizophrenia, manic depressive disorders, and autism. Ultimately, the critical role of purinergic receptors in various pathophysiological states identifies the P2 receptors as important drug targets for therapeutic intervention.

We intend to evaluate the involvement of purinergic receptors and nucleotides in healthy and unhealthy brain functioning.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to:
• Purinergic signaling in cell proliferation.
• Purinergic signaling in cell differentiation.
• Purinergic signaling in cell death.
• Purinergic signaling modulates learning and memory.
• Purinergic signaling modulates locomotor activity.
• Purinergic signaling modulates feeding behavior.
• Purinergic signaling modulates pathophysiology of the CNS

Keywords: Purines, Purinergic, receptors


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Purinergic neurotransmission involves the release of ATP as an efferent neurotransmitter and co-transmitter in the CNS. The concept of “purinergic transmission” led to the discovery of purinergic receptors which are divided into ionotropic P2X receptors (P2XRs) and metabotropic P2Y receptors (P2XYRs). To date, seven genes encoding P2XRs (P2X1-P2X7) and eight genes encoding P2YRs (P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6, P2Y11, P2Y12, P2Y13, P2Y14) have been discovered. In addition, the ionotropic P2XRs and G protein coupled P2YRs for nucleosides and nucleotides are widely expressed in multiple cell types (neurons, microglia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and Schwann cells) in the brain and spinal cord, mediating various aspects of neurotransmission (neurotransmitter release, regulation of synaptic currents), neuromodulation, and death. Purinergic signaling regulates physiological functions as learning and memory, locomotor activity, reward behavior, emotional responses, socio-communication, feeding and nociception. This diverse role of purinergic signaling in CNS physiology has identified the relevance and the importance of purinergic receptors to multiple diseased states of the CNS, including ischemia, epilepsy, neurodegenerative disorders, schizophrenia, manic depressive disorders, and autism. Ultimately, the critical role of purinergic receptors in various pathophysiological states identifies the P2 receptors as important drug targets for therapeutic intervention.

We intend to evaluate the involvement of purinergic receptors and nucleotides in healthy and unhealthy brain functioning.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to:
• Purinergic signaling in cell proliferation.
• Purinergic signaling in cell differentiation.
• Purinergic signaling in cell death.
• Purinergic signaling modulates learning and memory.
• Purinergic signaling modulates locomotor activity.
• Purinergic signaling modulates feeding behavior.
• Purinergic signaling modulates pathophysiology of the CNS

Keywords: Purines, Purinergic, receptors


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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