About this Research Topic

Manuscript Submission Deadline 06 September 2022
Manuscript Extension Submission Deadline 06 October 2022

A number of optical methods have been used for the purpose of gas/chemical/bio molecule sensing since last four decades e.g. interferometry, spectroscopy of guided modes in optical waveguide structures, spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). With the help of these sensors, a desired quantity is determined by measuring the change in refractive index, absorbance and fluorescence properties of analyte molecules. SPR sensors are the most advantageous sensors for bio-chemical materials because pre-processing, such as fluorescence labelling, is not required as well as real-time analysis is possible. In 1968, E. Kretschmann et al. proposed the first SPR sensor having a quartz substrate coated with plasmonic metal, i.e., silver. Silver gives highest resolution whereas copper gives highest sensitivity among the possible plasmonic metals viz. gold, silver, copper, aluminium, sodium, and indium. In 1983, for the first time, B. Liedberg et al. demonstrated the SPR concept for bio-sensing application.

The SPR sensor set-ups e.g., GE Healthcare's Biacore T100, Bio-Rad's ProteOn XPR36, ForteBio's Octet RED384, and Wasatch Microfluidics's IBIS MX96, etc. have been commercialized to measure biomolecular interactions, including protein-protein interactions, small molecule/fragment-protein interactions, etc. But, these set-ups need to improve in terms of types of samples, limit of detection, selectivity/specificity, etc. Therefore, I would like to focus on the improvement of limit of detection and selectivity/specificity for different types of gas/chemical/bio samples.

The selectivity/specificity can be improved by surface functionalization of 2D nanomaterial with appropriate biomolecular recognition element for a particular sample. Further, the selectivity/specificity can be addressed by controlling the penetration depth of surface plasmon wave (SPW) into the sample.

Further, synthesis of large and uniform 2D nanomaterial is also challenging. The good quality nanomaterials can be synthesized by proper optimization of different parameters of the opted methodology e.g., chemical vapour deposition, liquid phase sonification etc. The successful transfer of synthesized nanomaterial on the deposited metal thin film is also challenging because the adopted method can corrode or oxidize the metal film which will deteriorate the performance of the sensor. Therefore, transfer method should also be optimized.

Research Topics include but are not limited to the following areas:

• To deposit uniform metal thin film, especially on the cylindrical surface as in the case of fiber optic SPR sensor.

• To synthesize large and uniform 2D nanomaterial needed for affinity towards biomolecular recognition element as well as towards metal thin film.

• Successful transfer of synthesized 2D nanomaterial on the deposited metal thin film.

• To improve the selectivity/specificity of the sensor towards particular desired molecules among different molecules in the sample.

• To improve the limit of detection for exact quantification.

• To control the penetration depth of surface plasmon wave (SPW) in the sample to enhance the selectivity/specificity.

• To enhance the propagation length of SPW in order to enhance the sensitivity.

Keywords: Biosensor, Nanomaterial, Plasmonics, Photonics, Optical Sensor, Surface Plasmon Resonance


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

A number of optical methods have been used for the purpose of gas/chemical/bio molecule sensing since last four decades e.g. interferometry, spectroscopy of guided modes in optical waveguide structures, spectroscopy, ellipsometry, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). With the help of these sensors, a desired quantity is determined by measuring the change in refractive index, absorbance and fluorescence properties of analyte molecules. SPR sensors are the most advantageous sensors for bio-chemical materials because pre-processing, such as fluorescence labelling, is not required as well as real-time analysis is possible. In 1968, E. Kretschmann et al. proposed the first SPR sensor having a quartz substrate coated with plasmonic metal, i.e., silver. Silver gives highest resolution whereas copper gives highest sensitivity among the possible plasmonic metals viz. gold, silver, copper, aluminium, sodium, and indium. In 1983, for the first time, B. Liedberg et al. demonstrated the SPR concept for bio-sensing application.

The SPR sensor set-ups e.g., GE Healthcare's Biacore T100, Bio-Rad's ProteOn XPR36, ForteBio's Octet RED384, and Wasatch Microfluidics's IBIS MX96, etc. have been commercialized to measure biomolecular interactions, including protein-protein interactions, small molecule/fragment-protein interactions, etc. But, these set-ups need to improve in terms of types of samples, limit of detection, selectivity/specificity, etc. Therefore, I would like to focus on the improvement of limit of detection and selectivity/specificity for different types of gas/chemical/bio samples.

The selectivity/specificity can be improved by surface functionalization of 2D nanomaterial with appropriate biomolecular recognition element for a particular sample. Further, the selectivity/specificity can be addressed by controlling the penetration depth of surface plasmon wave (SPW) into the sample.

Further, synthesis of large and uniform 2D nanomaterial is also challenging. The good quality nanomaterials can be synthesized by proper optimization of different parameters of the opted methodology e.g., chemical vapour deposition, liquid phase sonification etc. The successful transfer of synthesized nanomaterial on the deposited metal thin film is also challenging because the adopted method can corrode or oxidize the metal film which will deteriorate the performance of the sensor. Therefore, transfer method should also be optimized.

Research Topics include but are not limited to the following areas:

• To deposit uniform metal thin film, especially on the cylindrical surface as in the case of fiber optic SPR sensor.

• To synthesize large and uniform 2D nanomaterial needed for affinity towards biomolecular recognition element as well as towards metal thin film.

• Successful transfer of synthesized 2D nanomaterial on the deposited metal thin film.

• To improve the selectivity/specificity of the sensor towards particular desired molecules among different molecules in the sample.

• To improve the limit of detection for exact quantification.

• To control the penetration depth of surface plasmon wave (SPW) in the sample to enhance the selectivity/specificity.

• To enhance the propagation length of SPW in order to enhance the sensitivity.

Keywords: Biosensor, Nanomaterial, Plasmonics, Photonics, Optical Sensor, Surface Plasmon Resonance


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Topic Coordinators

Loading..

articles

Sort by:

Loading..

authors

Loading..

views

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Share on

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.