About this Research Topic

Abstract Submission Deadline 22 August 2022
Manuscript Submission Deadline 21 October 2022

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is one of the most prevalent conditions globally. Traditionally, patients with OSA are considered to have excessive daytime sleepiness, but the recent data also suggest that many patients with OSA have insomnia and may not present with the classic findings of excessive daytime sleepiness. Moreover, it has been reported that OSA is rather common among people suffering from insomnia. The association of OSA and insomnia has been recently indicated as “COMISA”, an acronym for COMorbid Insomnia and Sleep Apnea.

Although much research has been carried out on this topic, some nosological, pathogenetic, clinical and management aspects of this condition remain uncertain. Studies published so far have shown that features of OSA patients with insomnia symptoms may highly differ: OSA, in terms of apnea/hypopnea index, may be mild or severe; excessive sleepiness may or may not coexist; difficulty to initiate or to maintain sleep may be the main insomnia symptom; treatment of OSA may or may not relieve insomnia. Moreover, insomnia could occur independently of OSA or represent just a clinical manifestation of apneas. Thus, it is possible that various COMISA phenotypes exist, which highly differ in pathogenetic mechanisms and clinical picture, and that require different management strategies. Other aspects of COMISA are poorly known. Little is known about risks associated with this condition. Some studies have pointed out a higher incidence of comorbidities and a higher mortality rate than in OSA without insomnia, but there still exist controversies among literature. Besides, there is little experience on the therapeutic approach to insomniac OSA patients, which tends to be difficult, both because of low tolerance of CPAP and of insufficient efficacy of traditional insomnia therapies. There is significant need to address the combination of insomnia and OSA.

This special issue will address:

• Epidemiology of COMISA
• Insomnia in OSA, OSA in insomnia, or OSA and insomnia: Is a new nosological classification of patients with OSA and insomnia required?
• Phenotypical evaluation of patients with OSA and insomnia symptoms
• Risks and natural history of COMISA
• Treatment strategies for patients with OSA and insomnia symptoms
• Diagnosis of COMISA
• Management of COMISA

This Research Topic welcomes original research articles, reviews, and meta-analyses.

Keywords: COMISA, Co-Morbid Insomnia Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is one of the most prevalent conditions globally. Traditionally, patients with OSA are considered to have excessive daytime sleepiness, but the recent data also suggest that many patients with OSA have insomnia and may not present with the classic findings of excessive daytime sleepiness. Moreover, it has been reported that OSA is rather common among people suffering from insomnia. The association of OSA and insomnia has been recently indicated as “COMISA”, an acronym for COMorbid Insomnia and Sleep Apnea.

Although much research has been carried out on this topic, some nosological, pathogenetic, clinical and management aspects of this condition remain uncertain. Studies published so far have shown that features of OSA patients with insomnia symptoms may highly differ: OSA, in terms of apnea/hypopnea index, may be mild or severe; excessive sleepiness may or may not coexist; difficulty to initiate or to maintain sleep may be the main insomnia symptom; treatment of OSA may or may not relieve insomnia. Moreover, insomnia could occur independently of OSA or represent just a clinical manifestation of apneas. Thus, it is possible that various COMISA phenotypes exist, which highly differ in pathogenetic mechanisms and clinical picture, and that require different management strategies. Other aspects of COMISA are poorly known. Little is known about risks associated with this condition. Some studies have pointed out a higher incidence of comorbidities and a higher mortality rate than in OSA without insomnia, but there still exist controversies among literature. Besides, there is little experience on the therapeutic approach to insomniac OSA patients, which tends to be difficult, both because of low tolerance of CPAP and of insufficient efficacy of traditional insomnia therapies. There is significant need to address the combination of insomnia and OSA.

This special issue will address:

• Epidemiology of COMISA
• Insomnia in OSA, OSA in insomnia, or OSA and insomnia: Is a new nosological classification of patients with OSA and insomnia required?
• Phenotypical evaluation of patients with OSA and insomnia symptoms
• Risks and natural history of COMISA
• Treatment strategies for patients with OSA and insomnia symptoms
• Diagnosis of COMISA
• Management of COMISA

This Research Topic welcomes original research articles, reviews, and meta-analyses.

Keywords: COMISA, Co-Morbid Insomnia Sleep Apnea, Obstructive Sleep Apnea


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Topic Coordinators

Loading..

articles

Sort by:

Loading..

authors

Loading..

views

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Share on

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.