About this Research Topic

Abstract Submission Deadline 04 October 2022
Manuscript Submission Deadline 08 November 2022

The properties and performance of building materials are modified by moisture and heat transfer. Wood, brick, stone, mortar and concrete are porous and complicate materials, such complex microstructure impact the performance and their durability. The organic and inorganic nature of materials contribute to chemical reactions, for example, CEMENT hydration is a complex process involving a large number of simultaneous chemical reactions, and in the case of WOOD, moisture affects the physical properties and allow the fungi attack.
Wood is an organic material, and concrete an inorganic one, nevertheless both reveals a hygroscopic and anisotropic architecture. By absorbing moisture, as vapor or liquid, wood deteriorates. Moisture problems in wooden materials impact the diagnosis and in-site performance. In the case of cement, it remains a very important building material. In cement, the moisture allows the formation of minerals, modifying the porous network, then, moisture and heat patterns in building materials must be characterized in order to improve their performance.

For concretes, the loss of adsorbed water from the gel particles causes significant shrinkage. In concretes, approximately half of the drying shrinkage is irreversible. The kinetics of moisture losses in cements are quite different from those observed in brick and stone materials. All inorganic materials are composed of minerals and all minerals are some extent soluble. Water migration also carried substances such as atmospheric pollutants, salts, and other contaminants. Complex chemical reactions cause mechanical damage in building materials, furthermore, moisture and heat transfer limits the performance and durability of brick, stone, concrete and wood material.
The physical properties of wood are influenced by moisture, and moisture transport is often a simultaneous phenomenon with heat transfer. Hydroxyl groups in wood are responsible for water absorption and dehydration that leads to swelling and shrinkage, in this way moisture affects the wood performance. Furthermore, when the moisture content is above 20%, wood is susceptible to attack by fungi and bacteria, which can release cellulase or hemicellulase to degrade the cell wall polysaccharides. Such biodegradation results in an unacceptable loss of mechanical properties.

The present issue aims to provide new evidence, methods, data, information, models, simulations, theory, and in general new tools to improve the understanding and propose innovative solutions to various problems of moisture and heat transfer in building materials.

Advanced Moisture and Heat transport in building materials, collects manuscripts dealing with computational simulations for heat and moisture transport (simultaneous and non-simultaneous), multiscale simulation of transport phenomena in building materials, heat and moisture transport coupled to chemical reactions, non-destructive methods to characterize, and analyze building materials, and new strategies to validate computational data.

Keywords: Transport phenomena, computational simulation, non-destructive techniques, multi-scale, multiphase


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The properties and performance of building materials are modified by moisture and heat transfer. Wood, brick, stone, mortar and concrete are porous and complicate materials, such complex microstructure impact the performance and their durability. The organic and inorganic nature of materials contribute to chemical reactions, for example, CEMENT hydration is a complex process involving a large number of simultaneous chemical reactions, and in the case of WOOD, moisture affects the physical properties and allow the fungi attack.
Wood is an organic material, and concrete an inorganic one, nevertheless both reveals a hygroscopic and anisotropic architecture. By absorbing moisture, as vapor or liquid, wood deteriorates. Moisture problems in wooden materials impact the diagnosis and in-site performance. In the case of cement, it remains a very important building material. In cement, the moisture allows the formation of minerals, modifying the porous network, then, moisture and heat patterns in building materials must be characterized in order to improve their performance.

For concretes, the loss of adsorbed water from the gel particles causes significant shrinkage. In concretes, approximately half of the drying shrinkage is irreversible. The kinetics of moisture losses in cements are quite different from those observed in brick and stone materials. All inorganic materials are composed of minerals and all minerals are some extent soluble. Water migration also carried substances such as atmospheric pollutants, salts, and other contaminants. Complex chemical reactions cause mechanical damage in building materials, furthermore, moisture and heat transfer limits the performance and durability of brick, stone, concrete and wood material.
The physical properties of wood are influenced by moisture, and moisture transport is often a simultaneous phenomenon with heat transfer. Hydroxyl groups in wood are responsible for water absorption and dehydration that leads to swelling and shrinkage, in this way moisture affects the wood performance. Furthermore, when the moisture content is above 20%, wood is susceptible to attack by fungi and bacteria, which can release cellulase or hemicellulase to degrade the cell wall polysaccharides. Such biodegradation results in an unacceptable loss of mechanical properties.

The present issue aims to provide new evidence, methods, data, information, models, simulations, theory, and in general new tools to improve the understanding and propose innovative solutions to various problems of moisture and heat transfer in building materials.

Advanced Moisture and Heat transport in building materials, collects manuscripts dealing with computational simulations for heat and moisture transport (simultaneous and non-simultaneous), multiscale simulation of transport phenomena in building materials, heat and moisture transport coupled to chemical reactions, non-destructive methods to characterize, and analyze building materials, and new strategies to validate computational data.

Keywords: Transport phenomena, computational simulation, non-destructive techniques, multi-scale, multiphase


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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