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Manuscript Submission Deadline 28 February 2023

Migration is an integral part of the annual cycle of many bird species that have evolved to take advantage of spatially segregated, seasonally abundant food resources while avoiding harsh winter conditions. However, environmental conditions are changing rapidly, including changes in resource availability and global warming. Therefore, migration comes at a price as such anthropogenic changes are known to affect populations of migratory species by increasing mortality and thus many of them have undergone substantial declines. Furthermore, on the global scale it is suggested that human activities might be affecting the movement ecology and behavior of long-lived species via phenotypic flexibility and/or shifts in migration phenology.

But how do raptors adapt to these changes? Raptors have always been of a particular interest due to the fact that many of them migrate, and, because of their ecology and distribution, they often play a key role in the conservation of habitats, ecosystems and other bird populations. This guild provides important ecosystem services and declines in their populations might have negative impacts on broader ecosystems. Migratory raptors exhibit high variability in their migration strategies and performance. Identifying the causes and implications of changes in these patterns is of utmost importance as they are also related to the survival, adaptation and persistence of migratory populations. Beyond that, there is also a link between the demographic processes, the migratory strategies and trade-offs therein.

The aim of the Research Topic is to bring together studies particularly dealing with migration strategies and patterns in migratory raptors in an anthropogenically changing environment to further shed light and identify drivers behind observed patterns of survival, demography and evolution, to assess their resilience to environmental change and explore potential adaptive responses to climate change. We welcome submissions that particularly inform conservation planning and aim to improve management decisions towards halting declines and mitigating impacts of anthropogenic changes to raptor populations, thus ensuring population viability and recruitment in the long-term. Finally, we encourage submissions of original manuscripts that are exploring relationships between the migratory phenotype and population genetics thus aiming to a better understanding of the molecular basis of migration. As raptors are globally distributed, we would like to introduce a unique collection that gathers studies from different migratory flyways and thus contributes to the better understanding of migration strategies in a global scale.

Keywords: raptors, migration ecology, long-distance migration, migratory connectivity, migratory performance, migration parameters, conservation and threats


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Migration is an integral part of the annual cycle of many bird species that have evolved to take advantage of spatially segregated, seasonally abundant food resources while avoiding harsh winter conditions. However, environmental conditions are changing rapidly, including changes in resource availability and global warming. Therefore, migration comes at a price as such anthropogenic changes are known to affect populations of migratory species by increasing mortality and thus many of them have undergone substantial declines. Furthermore, on the global scale it is suggested that human activities might be affecting the movement ecology and behavior of long-lived species via phenotypic flexibility and/or shifts in migration phenology.

But how do raptors adapt to these changes? Raptors have always been of a particular interest due to the fact that many of them migrate, and, because of their ecology and distribution, they often play a key role in the conservation of habitats, ecosystems and other bird populations. This guild provides important ecosystem services and declines in their populations might have negative impacts on broader ecosystems. Migratory raptors exhibit high variability in their migration strategies and performance. Identifying the causes and implications of changes in these patterns is of utmost importance as they are also related to the survival, adaptation and persistence of migratory populations. Beyond that, there is also a link between the demographic processes, the migratory strategies and trade-offs therein.

The aim of the Research Topic is to bring together studies particularly dealing with migration strategies and patterns in migratory raptors in an anthropogenically changing environment to further shed light and identify drivers behind observed patterns of survival, demography and evolution, to assess their resilience to environmental change and explore potential adaptive responses to climate change. We welcome submissions that particularly inform conservation planning and aim to improve management decisions towards halting declines and mitigating impacts of anthropogenic changes to raptor populations, thus ensuring population viability and recruitment in the long-term. Finally, we encourage submissions of original manuscripts that are exploring relationships between the migratory phenotype and population genetics thus aiming to a better understanding of the molecular basis of migration. As raptors are globally distributed, we would like to introduce a unique collection that gathers studies from different migratory flyways and thus contributes to the better understanding of migration strategies in a global scale.

Keywords: raptors, migration ecology, long-distance migration, migratory connectivity, migratory performance, migration parameters, conservation and threats


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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