About this Research Topic

Abstract Submission Deadline 31 December 2022
Manuscript Submission Deadline 31 May 2023

Studies have repeatedly shown that workplaces across the world function as microcosms of their broader social worlds in that they are riven with inequalities which follow conventional sociological lines of class, gender, ‘race’, migration status, and dis/ability, and that these axes of inequality intersect in complex ways. Workplaces are in themselves sites for the production of inequality: different conditions are unequal—e.g., salaries, positions, influence in the workplace, and sense of workplace security—which, in turn, generates further inequalities both inside and outside the workplace.

To better understand how inequality is upheld in particular workplaces, it is important to study how these different kinds of inequality are related and, from an intersectional perspective, how different groups of people are disadvantaged.

In order to analyze workplace inequality, Joan Acker has coined the concept of inequality regime. Acker, like Donald Tomaskovic-Devey, is careful to point out that practices and meaning-making in particular workplaces interact with processes, practices, and meaning-making in the surrounding societies, and that they do so at a national, regional, and global level. To understand inequality in individual workplaces, it is therefore also crucial to appreciate how processes and relations are related to national, regional, and global developments. For example, changed employment laws might affect exploitation patterns, and hence class relations, in all workplaces.

Furthermore, feminist work has brought to light the interrelationship between gender inequalities at work and at home. Arlie Hochschild’s classic study of emotional labor at work shows the ways in which the exploitation of a worker’s own emotions both builds on, and perpetuates, wider regimes of gender inequality. Another example of this kind of interconnectedness concerns how the increasing racism within society might put migrant workers at a disadvantage in their workplaces. Both the workplace processes that create and maintain inequality regimes and their connections with larger societal processes are thus deserving of further study.

This Frontiers of Sociology Research Topic will focus on workplace inequalities, both as vectors, and as the outcomes, of inequality. The Research Topic welcomes contributions that:

- Present new takes on how different inequalities interact in particular workplaces around the world. The interactions studied and theorized might be intersectional connections between the inequalities of several groups. Interactions of interest are also those between different inequalities, such as wage inequality and inequality of influence.

- Relate research on inequality regimes/inequality in particular workplaces with research on labor markets in one or several sectors, and global or national processes. How do inequalities in particular workplaces reflect, or otherwise communicate with national and international trends, practices, and discourses?

Empirical and theoretical contributions are welcome. Contributions may be longitudinal and can focus on recent as well as historical developments. They may combine qualitative and quantitative methods, though this is not essential.

Keywords: workplace, inequality, class, race, gender


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Studies have repeatedly shown that workplaces across the world function as microcosms of their broader social worlds in that they are riven with inequalities which follow conventional sociological lines of class, gender, ‘race’, migration status, and dis/ability, and that these axes of inequality intersect in complex ways. Workplaces are in themselves sites for the production of inequality: different conditions are unequal—e.g., salaries, positions, influence in the workplace, and sense of workplace security—which, in turn, generates further inequalities both inside and outside the workplace.

To better understand how inequality is upheld in particular workplaces, it is important to study how these different kinds of inequality are related and, from an intersectional perspective, how different groups of people are disadvantaged.

In order to analyze workplace inequality, Joan Acker has coined the concept of inequality regime. Acker, like Donald Tomaskovic-Devey, is careful to point out that practices and meaning-making in particular workplaces interact with processes, practices, and meaning-making in the surrounding societies, and that they do so at a national, regional, and global level. To understand inequality in individual workplaces, it is therefore also crucial to appreciate how processes and relations are related to national, regional, and global developments. For example, changed employment laws might affect exploitation patterns, and hence class relations, in all workplaces.

Furthermore, feminist work has brought to light the interrelationship between gender inequalities at work and at home. Arlie Hochschild’s classic study of emotional labor at work shows the ways in which the exploitation of a worker’s own emotions both builds on, and perpetuates, wider regimes of gender inequality. Another example of this kind of interconnectedness concerns how the increasing racism within society might put migrant workers at a disadvantage in their workplaces. Both the workplace processes that create and maintain inequality regimes and their connections with larger societal processes are thus deserving of further study.

This Frontiers of Sociology Research Topic will focus on workplace inequalities, both as vectors, and as the outcomes, of inequality. The Research Topic welcomes contributions that:

- Present new takes on how different inequalities interact in particular workplaces around the world. The interactions studied and theorized might be intersectional connections between the inequalities of several groups. Interactions of interest are also those between different inequalities, such as wage inequality and inequality of influence.

- Relate research on inequality regimes/inequality in particular workplaces with research on labor markets in one or several sectors, and global or national processes. How do inequalities in particular workplaces reflect, or otherwise communicate with national and international trends, practices, and discourses?

Empirical and theoretical contributions are welcome. Contributions may be longitudinal and can focus on recent as well as historical developments. They may combine qualitative and quantitative methods, though this is not essential.

Keywords: workplace, inequality, class, race, gender


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Topic Coordinators

Loading..

articles

Sort by:

Loading..

authors

Loading..

views

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Share on

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.