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Manuscript Submission Deadline 17 November 2022
Manuscript Extension Submission Deadline 17 December 2022

The vascular endothelium lining all blood vessels plays a vital role in controlling tissue-fluid homeostasis. The lung is the most vascularized organ in the body, and vascular endothelial cells (EC) account for 50% of pulmonary cells. The endothelium regulates the transport of nutrients, protein, water, and leukocytes across the vessel wall that is essential for maintaining tissue and fluid homeostasis and robust immune responses. Thus, injury of the endothelial barrier is itself considered as an underlying mechanism of inflammation and edema formation. Injury of the endothelial barrier can be the hallmark of several diseases, including acute lung injury (ALI) and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) as well as ARDS-COVID. Acute lung injury remains a challenging lung disease despite the emergence of new pharmacological and cell therapies.

Endothelial cells (EC) provide a fertile niche for maintenance of lung function throughout their lifecycle. EC sense and respond to fluid flow and regulate immune cell trafficking. Evidence indicates that EC form the vascular niche, to serve as instructive frameworks that provide the essential paracrine signaling cues to promote tissue homeostasis and regeneration. There are various facets of the role of EC niche to decipher, such as what are the fundamental characteristics of an EC niche, fostering properties of the niche, cellular sources for nurturing, mechanisms involved in controlling the access of immune cells to the EC niche, cell-cell communication that coordinate the function of different cells within each EC niche, mechanisms underlying self-maintenance of distinct endothelia populations, outlining the organizing principles of the endothelial niche, and how endothelial cell function can be manipulated by targeting their niche.

We welcome various types of manuscripts including original research papers and review articles. All manuscripts should be relevant to the following themes but not limited to:

1. Programming of endothelial cells in maintaining their niche.

2. Crosstalk within its milieu such as with immune cells and epithelial cells.

3. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying self-maintenance of endothelial cell population.

4. Translational outcomes by targeting lung endothelial niche.

5. Lung injury and homeostasis.

Keywords: tissue-fluid homeostasis, endothelial barrier, inflammation, endothelial cells, lung injury


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The vascular endothelium lining all blood vessels plays a vital role in controlling tissue-fluid homeostasis. The lung is the most vascularized organ in the body, and vascular endothelial cells (EC) account for 50% of pulmonary cells. The endothelium regulates the transport of nutrients, protein, water, and leukocytes across the vessel wall that is essential for maintaining tissue and fluid homeostasis and robust immune responses. Thus, injury of the endothelial barrier is itself considered as an underlying mechanism of inflammation and edema formation. Injury of the endothelial barrier can be the hallmark of several diseases, including acute lung injury (ALI) and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) as well as ARDS-COVID. Acute lung injury remains a challenging lung disease despite the emergence of new pharmacological and cell therapies.

Endothelial cells (EC) provide a fertile niche for maintenance of lung function throughout their lifecycle. EC sense and respond to fluid flow and regulate immune cell trafficking. Evidence indicates that EC form the vascular niche, to serve as instructive frameworks that provide the essential paracrine signaling cues to promote tissue homeostasis and regeneration. There are various facets of the role of EC niche to decipher, such as what are the fundamental characteristics of an EC niche, fostering properties of the niche, cellular sources for nurturing, mechanisms involved in controlling the access of immune cells to the EC niche, cell-cell communication that coordinate the function of different cells within each EC niche, mechanisms underlying self-maintenance of distinct endothelia populations, outlining the organizing principles of the endothelial niche, and how endothelial cell function can be manipulated by targeting their niche.

We welcome various types of manuscripts including original research papers and review articles. All manuscripts should be relevant to the following themes but not limited to:

1. Programming of endothelial cells in maintaining their niche.

2. Crosstalk within its milieu such as with immune cells and epithelial cells.

3. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying self-maintenance of endothelial cell population.

4. Translational outcomes by targeting lung endothelial niche.

5. Lung injury and homeostasis.

Keywords: tissue-fluid homeostasis, endothelial barrier, inflammation, endothelial cells, lung injury


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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