About this Research Topic

Abstract Submission Deadline 31 August 2022
Manuscript Submission Deadline 30 November 2022

The anthropogenic activities such as mining, metallurgy, and chemical industries increased toxic metal(loid)s dissemination in the soil. Toxic metal(loid)s can alter the structure and metabolism of microbial communities in soil due to the adaption of microorganisms to toxic metal(loid)s stresses. In turn, the speciation and solubility of metal(loid)s can be influenced by microbial metabolic activity and survival strategies. Understanding their interactions in the soil will promote the identification of keystone taxa that govern the mobility and toxicity of these metal(loid)s.

Biomobilization can utilize microbes to promote the change of metal(loid)s into soluble fractions and increase their mobility in soil, which facilitates the uptake of toxic metal(loid)s by hyperaccumulator or direct leaching from the soil. Bioimmobilization can capture toxic metal(loid)s into long-term stable solid phases through extracellular induction or intracellular metabolism, leading to decreased mobility and bioavailability in soil. Therefore, biomobilization and bioimmobilization are promising approaches for remediation of toxic metal(loid)s contaminated soil.

The goal of this Research Topic is to (i) reveal the multimodal interactions of toxic metal(loid) pollutants with the soil microbiota including molecular and biochemical mechanisms of toxic metal(loid)–microbe interactions, and model of soil microbial community dynamics and evolution; (ii) identify new microbes for biomobilization and bioimmobilization to remediate toxic metal(loid) contaminated soils in a cost-effective and long-term approach.

The scope of this Research Topic welcomes submissions of different types of manuscripts, including original research papers, reviews, and mini-reviews. Themes include but are not limited to:

- Response of composition and diversity of soil microbial communities to toxic metal(loid) pollution.
- Metagenome and metatranscriptomics for predicting microbial community function in toxic metal(loid) contaminated soil.
- Metaproteomics for revealing proteins exploiting soil toxic metal(loid) pollutants.
- Modeling and prediction in microbial community dynamics and evolution under toxic metal(loid) stress.
- Biomobilization assisted the phytoremediation of toxic metal(loid) contaminated farmland.
- Directly removal of toxic metal(loid)s from the soil by biomobilization/bioleaching.
- Soil toxic metal(loid)s bioimmobilization through biosorption, bio-oxidation/reduction, biomineralization, etc.

Please note that this Research Topic highlights the need for hypothesis-driven submissions that investigate mechanisms of (im)mobilization, but pure descriptive research is not welcomed.

Conflict of Interest: Dr. Yonatan Sher is affiliated with a private company: Haifa-group. The other topic editors declared no conflict of interest with Dr. Yonatan Sher.

Keywords: Soil microbiome, Toxic metal(loid) pollutant, Microbial ecology, Multi-omics technologies, Biomobilization, Bioimmobilization, Soil remediation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The anthropogenic activities such as mining, metallurgy, and chemical industries increased toxic metal(loid)s dissemination in the soil. Toxic metal(loid)s can alter the structure and metabolism of microbial communities in soil due to the adaption of microorganisms to toxic metal(loid)s stresses. In turn, the speciation and solubility of metal(loid)s can be influenced by microbial metabolic activity and survival strategies. Understanding their interactions in the soil will promote the identification of keystone taxa that govern the mobility and toxicity of these metal(loid)s.

Biomobilization can utilize microbes to promote the change of metal(loid)s into soluble fractions and increase their mobility in soil, which facilitates the uptake of toxic metal(loid)s by hyperaccumulator or direct leaching from the soil. Bioimmobilization can capture toxic metal(loid)s into long-term stable solid phases through extracellular induction or intracellular metabolism, leading to decreased mobility and bioavailability in soil. Therefore, biomobilization and bioimmobilization are promising approaches for remediation of toxic metal(loid)s contaminated soil.

The goal of this Research Topic is to (i) reveal the multimodal interactions of toxic metal(loid) pollutants with the soil microbiota including molecular and biochemical mechanisms of toxic metal(loid)–microbe interactions, and model of soil microbial community dynamics and evolution; (ii) identify new microbes for biomobilization and bioimmobilization to remediate toxic metal(loid) contaminated soils in a cost-effective and long-term approach.

The scope of this Research Topic welcomes submissions of different types of manuscripts, including original research papers, reviews, and mini-reviews. Themes include but are not limited to:

- Response of composition and diversity of soil microbial communities to toxic metal(loid) pollution.
- Metagenome and metatranscriptomics for predicting microbial community function in toxic metal(loid) contaminated soil.
- Metaproteomics for revealing proteins exploiting soil toxic metal(loid) pollutants.
- Modeling and prediction in microbial community dynamics and evolution under toxic metal(loid) stress.
- Biomobilization assisted the phytoremediation of toxic metal(loid) contaminated farmland.
- Directly removal of toxic metal(loid)s from the soil by biomobilization/bioleaching.
- Soil toxic metal(loid)s bioimmobilization through biosorption, bio-oxidation/reduction, biomineralization, etc.

Please note that this Research Topic highlights the need for hypothesis-driven submissions that investigate mechanisms of (im)mobilization, but pure descriptive research is not welcomed.

Conflict of Interest: Dr. Yonatan Sher is affiliated with a private company: Haifa-group. The other topic editors declared no conflict of interest with Dr. Yonatan Sher.

Keywords: Soil microbiome, Toxic metal(loid) pollutant, Microbial ecology, Multi-omics technologies, Biomobilization, Bioimmobilization, Soil remediation


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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