About this Research Topic

Abstract Submission Deadline 23 November 2022
Manuscript Submission Deadline 08 February 2023

The human residential microorganism, including bacteria, archaea, eukaryotes, protozoa, fungi, and viruses, consists of a complex ecosystem that plays an essential role in both health and disease, especially in maintaining the nutritional, metabolic, and immunological balance in the host. Among them, bacteria are predominant and primarily colonize the gastrointestinal tract. The human gut microbiota harbors over 100 trillion microorganisms (consisting of about 66% of the human microbiota), which express 150 times more genes (more than 3 million genes) than the host genome.

Enormous numbers of reports show that the intestinal microbiota plays a role in the progression or prevention of many diseases depending on the compositional and functional profiles of gut bacterial communities. Recent evidence strongly suggests that the interplay between the dysbiosis in the gut microbial communities is also involved in endocrine diseases. Endocrine diseases are provoked by the immune-mediated destabilization of hormone-producing endocrine cells. It is suspected that the breakdown of the host immunity tolerance may be initiated by the disruption of microbial homeostasis. It was postulated that the contribution of human gut microbiota and host physiology creates a functional estrobolome.

Estrobolome consists of microbiome products that can metabolize estrogens. For example, bacteria species that possess β-glucuronidases and β-glucuronides, are involved in estrogen de-conjugation and conjugation, influencing the enterohepatic circulation of estrogens and affecting circulating and excreted estrogen levels. Thus, it may be possible that a woman’s lifetime burden of estrogen exposure may reflect in part the metabolic functioning of her estrobolome. Estrobolome-related disturbances, especially in functional activity, influence host-estrogen equilibria and may be intensely involved in estrogen-driven diseases.

This Research Topic will collect reports, original studies, and reviews providing a broad insight into the role of the gut microbiome in influencing the pathophysiology of endocrine-related diseases. It will be focused mainly on the interplay between estrogen metabolism and functional estrobolome diseases such as estrogen-related cancers, mood disturbance, heart disease, obesity, infertility, metabolic syndrome, and others.

Keywords: estrogen, estrobolome, gut-hormone axis, gut microbiota, microbiome


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The human residential microorganism, including bacteria, archaea, eukaryotes, protozoa, fungi, and viruses, consists of a complex ecosystem that plays an essential role in both health and disease, especially in maintaining the nutritional, metabolic, and immunological balance in the host. Among them, bacteria are predominant and primarily colonize the gastrointestinal tract. The human gut microbiota harbors over 100 trillion microorganisms (consisting of about 66% of the human microbiota), which express 150 times more genes (more than 3 million genes) than the host genome.

Enormous numbers of reports show that the intestinal microbiota plays a role in the progression or prevention of many diseases depending on the compositional and functional profiles of gut bacterial communities. Recent evidence strongly suggests that the interplay between the dysbiosis in the gut microbial communities is also involved in endocrine diseases. Endocrine diseases are provoked by the immune-mediated destabilization of hormone-producing endocrine cells. It is suspected that the breakdown of the host immunity tolerance may be initiated by the disruption of microbial homeostasis. It was postulated that the contribution of human gut microbiota and host physiology creates a functional estrobolome.

Estrobolome consists of microbiome products that can metabolize estrogens. For example, bacteria species that possess β-glucuronidases and β-glucuronides, are involved in estrogen de-conjugation and conjugation, influencing the enterohepatic circulation of estrogens and affecting circulating and excreted estrogen levels. Thus, it may be possible that a woman’s lifetime burden of estrogen exposure may reflect in part the metabolic functioning of her estrobolome. Estrobolome-related disturbances, especially in functional activity, influence host-estrogen equilibria and may be intensely involved in estrogen-driven diseases.

This Research Topic will collect reports, original studies, and reviews providing a broad insight into the role of the gut microbiome in influencing the pathophysiology of endocrine-related diseases. It will be focused mainly on the interplay between estrogen metabolism and functional estrobolome diseases such as estrogen-related cancers, mood disturbance, heart disease, obesity, infertility, metabolic syndrome, and others.

Keywords: estrogen, estrobolome, gut-hormone axis, gut microbiota, microbiome


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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