Research Topic

Plant immunity against viruses

About this Research Topic

Plant viruses impose a serious threat on agriculture, which motivates extensive breeding efforts for viral resistant crops and inspires lasting interests on basic research to understand the mechanisms underlying plant immunity against viruses. Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites. Their genomes are ...

Plant viruses impose a serious threat on agriculture, which motivates extensive breeding efforts for viral resistant crops and inspires lasting interests on basic research to understand the mechanisms underlying plant immunity against viruses. Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites. Their genomes are usually small and only encode a few products that are essential to hijack host machinery for their nucleotide and protein biosynthesis, and that are necessary to suppress host immunity. Plants evolved multilayers of defense mechanisms to defeat viral infection.

RNA silencing mediated antiviral immunity is recognized as a broad spectrum pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered immunity (or PTI). Plant Dicer-like (DCL) enzymes process viral RNAs into small interfering (si)RNA to guide plant endonuclease Agonautes to repress viral gene expression. In the past decade, extensive studies have been undertaken and have uncovered a comprehensive genetic frame-work of RNA silencing mediated viral immunity. However, successful virus infection can overcome antiviral RNA silencing. During the plant-virus arms race, plants have evolved effector triggered immunity (ETI) mediated by the nucleotide binding domain, leucine rich repeat containing receptor (NLR). NLR-mediated plant immunity against viruses was recognized and deployed in crop production about a hundred years ago. NLR proteins function as receptors inside plant cells and trigger rapid host defense upon recognition of viral avirulence products, usually associated with hypersensitive response. Since then, enormous efforts were devoted to cloning the NLR receptor and elucidating the signaling cascade involved in virus resistance. It is well studied that MAP kinase cascade, and plant hormone signaling pathway play important roles in NLR mediated antiviral immunity. Besides NLR and DCL triggered viral immunity, translation inhibition is also involved in plant resistance against viruses. In addition, recessive resistance to virus is also identified, such as PVY resistance conferred by certain allele of translation initiation factor eIF4E, which is not compatible with viral protein genome-linked (VPg) protein. We welcome research papers, short communications, reviews, and methods focused on the mechanisms of different forms of plant immunity against virus and application of these knowledge in engineering viral resistant crops.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recent Articles

Loading..

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top