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About this Research Topic

Abstract Submission Deadline 01 February 2023
Manuscript Submission Deadline 01 May 2023

This Research Topic aims to advance research on particular aspects of citizenship that have generated debate among different views on the role of citizenship in today’s complex political systems.

Citizenship is both a legal status and a normative ideal. For political thought, citizenship signifies a model of governance that gives pride of place to participation in the political process. For classical Greek thought, citizenship was viewed in terms of (a) continuous participation and (b) duties, such as taking turns in public office, devoting a considerable amount of time and energy to public affairs, and sharing a commitment to notions of the public good – the latter being a field of considerable exploration by Roman political thought.

Contemporary thought tends to emphasize citizenship as a matter of rights: citizens have the right to participate but they also have the right to favor a degree of detachment from public affairs and to place private endeavors ahead of public commitment and political involvement. As liberal strands have tended to put emphasis on the latter feature of modern and contemporary views on citizenship, a republican variant has re-emerged, criticizing the neglect of civic duties.

There are three different aspects – beyond the strictly legal – we wish to explore. Active citizenship as a participatory model, emphasizing citizens as active members of the polity. Affective citizenship as a model that fuses rational and emotional features as well as the different approaches on how to disentangle them. And acquired citizenship as an approach to the different and often controversial methods of acquiring citizenship in various political systems. The latter aspects focus in particular (but not exclusively) on different models of acquiring citizenship and their changes and reforms both conceptually and comparatively. It encourages controversy and debate between different views.

Possible themes:
- Theoretical and conceptual issues
- Citizenship and political participation in Europe, North America, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea
- Studying the impact of migration on approaches to citizenship
- The roles and influence of civic education - comparative
- Different empirical models of acquiring citizenship: case studies of established systems, new systems of testing and assessment, reforms in progress

Keywords: citizenship, political community, political participation, migration, civic educaton


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

This Research Topic aims to advance research on particular aspects of citizenship that have generated debate among different views on the role of citizenship in today’s complex political systems.

Citizenship is both a legal status and a normative ideal. For political thought, citizenship signifies a model of governance that gives pride of place to participation in the political process. For classical Greek thought, citizenship was viewed in terms of (a) continuous participation and (b) duties, such as taking turns in public office, devoting a considerable amount of time and energy to public affairs, and sharing a commitment to notions of the public good – the latter being a field of considerable exploration by Roman political thought.

Contemporary thought tends to emphasize citizenship as a matter of rights: citizens have the right to participate but they also have the right to favor a degree of detachment from public affairs and to place private endeavors ahead of public commitment and political involvement. As liberal strands have tended to put emphasis on the latter feature of modern and contemporary views on citizenship, a republican variant has re-emerged, criticizing the neglect of civic duties.

There are three different aspects – beyond the strictly legal – we wish to explore. Active citizenship as a participatory model, emphasizing citizens as active members of the polity. Affective citizenship as a model that fuses rational and emotional features as well as the different approaches on how to disentangle them. And acquired citizenship as an approach to the different and often controversial methods of acquiring citizenship in various political systems. The latter aspects focus in particular (but not exclusively) on different models of acquiring citizenship and their changes and reforms both conceptually and comparatively. It encourages controversy and debate between different views.

Possible themes:
- Theoretical and conceptual issues
- Citizenship and political participation in Europe, North America, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea
- Studying the impact of migration on approaches to citizenship
- The roles and influence of civic education - comparative
- Different empirical models of acquiring citizenship: case studies of established systems, new systems of testing and assessment, reforms in progress

Keywords: citizenship, political community, political participation, migration, civic educaton


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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