About this Research Topic

Abstract Submission Deadline 04 October 2022
Manuscript Submission Deadline 04 January 2023

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by repeated episodes of upper airway closure during sleep that results in recurrent oxyhemoglobin desaturation and sleep fragmentation. By 2020, the prevalence of OSA in the US has reached 26.6-43.2% in men and 8.7-27.8% in women. Considering the technological limitation to diagnosing OSA and the often neglected effects of snoring, we believe the adult incidence rate of OSA is significantly underrepresented in published data.

Intermittent hypoxia, sleep fragmentation, and increased pleural pressure are central mechanisms of OSA complications. In particular, intermittent hypoxia, described as repeated hypoxia and reoxygenation, is a unique pathological mechanism of OSA that aggravates body damage. Due to this unique pathological basis of OSA, the experimental model of intermittent hypoxia is the research hotspot in exploring OSA and its complications and further research on its molecular mechanism would be helpful to increase the understanding of OSA.

The main clinical symptoms of OSA include snoring, nocturnal awakening, nocturia, unrefreshing sleep, and daytime sleepiness, resulting in reduced quality of life. If left without treatment, OSA can also increase the risk for systemic complications such as cognitive impairment, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, increasing the academic attention to OSA disease and achieving early prevention, diagnosis, and treatment can effectively avoid related complications and reduce the burden on the global healthcare system.

The focus of this Research Topic is on OSA and we aim to guide academic discussions, strengthen international collaboration, and promote research on OSA. We encourage submissions related to the pathophysiology, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of OSA, from basic mechanistic studies to translational, preclinical, and clinical research. We welcome original research articles, reviews, systematic reviews, and clinical trials including the following subtopics:

• Epidemiology, pathophysiology, etiology, and risk factors of adult OSA.

• Clinical study (diagnosis or treatment) on OSA and its comorbidities in adults.

• Basic research (cell or animal study) on the mechanism of adult OSA.

Keywords: Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), snoring, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), polysomnography (PSG)


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by repeated episodes of upper airway closure during sleep that results in recurrent oxyhemoglobin desaturation and sleep fragmentation. By 2020, the prevalence of OSA in the US has reached 26.6-43.2% in men and 8.7-27.8% in women. Considering the technological limitation to diagnosing OSA and the often neglected effects of snoring, we believe the adult incidence rate of OSA is significantly underrepresented in published data.

Intermittent hypoxia, sleep fragmentation, and increased pleural pressure are central mechanisms of OSA complications. In particular, intermittent hypoxia, described as repeated hypoxia and reoxygenation, is a unique pathological mechanism of OSA that aggravates body damage. Due to this unique pathological basis of OSA, the experimental model of intermittent hypoxia is the research hotspot in exploring OSA and its complications and further research on its molecular mechanism would be helpful to increase the understanding of OSA.

The main clinical symptoms of OSA include snoring, nocturnal awakening, nocturia, unrefreshing sleep, and daytime sleepiness, resulting in reduced quality of life. If left without treatment, OSA can also increase the risk for systemic complications such as cognitive impairment, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, increasing the academic attention to OSA disease and achieving early prevention, diagnosis, and treatment can effectively avoid related complications and reduce the burden on the global healthcare system.

The focus of this Research Topic is on OSA and we aim to guide academic discussions, strengthen international collaboration, and promote research on OSA. We encourage submissions related to the pathophysiology, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of OSA, from basic mechanistic studies to translational, preclinical, and clinical research. We welcome original research articles, reviews, systematic reviews, and clinical trials including the following subtopics:

• Epidemiology, pathophysiology, etiology, and risk factors of adult OSA.

• Clinical study (diagnosis or treatment) on OSA and its comorbidities in adults.

• Basic research (cell or animal study) on the mechanism of adult OSA.

Keywords: Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), snoring, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), polysomnography (PSG)


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Topic Coordinators

Loading..

articles

Sort by:

Loading..

authors

Loading..

views

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Share on

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.