Skip to main content

About this Research Topic

Manuscript Submission Deadline 15 December 2022

The conventional nature of social behavior, conceived as interactions among individuals based on the exchange of specialized labor, products, and accumulated wealth, distinguishes human behavior from animal behavior. Nevertheless, those animal species in which neonates are born immature share with human beings a similar (not identical) nurturing process based on biological dependency: attachment. Speciation and socialization are the processes that take place, initially through attachment to caregivers in the natural and cultural environments, respectively. Attachment consists of a longitudinal process in which, through minimal (i.e., small scale or subtle) dyadic or triadic interactions, newborn individuals become affiliated to their species-specific group and ecological niche and the particular family group and cultural surroundings. Individuals learn specific response patterns (natural language in the case of humans), share common affective reactions to others’ behaviors, and recognize familiar and strange stimulus objects in the environment determining their approach/withdrawal tendencies. These processes promote reciprocity regarding other individuals in the group and determine the outgrowth of prosocial/antisocial behaviors critical for speciation and socialization. Prosocial behaviors, such as cooperation, altruism, competition, and others, are prior in evolution to the emergence of human societies and may be considered a functional antecedent for its arising when language was invented.

Minimal (i.e., small scale or subtle) interindividual interactions involve, in the case of attachment of a mature or older conspecific or member of the group which shapes and promotes the establishment of relevant ecological and social behaviors, fundamental of survival in animals, and for living together and subsistence in human beings. The analysis of attachment in terms of minimal interactions allows for a fine grain analysis of individual affiliation to species-specific and cultural behaviors.
Reciprocity, attachment, and prosocial behaviors such as cooperation involving altruism, or competition, are topics approached from several theoretical paradigms and disciplines. Psychology itself has analyzed these topics from different conceptual positions: social, evolutionary, economic, ethological, and anthropological, by mentioning some examples. In some cases, these approaches may complement each other, but in other cases, unfortunately, similarities are only terminological.
This Research Topic aims to showcase a wide diversity of work in this area, which is relevant because prosocial behaviors, attachment, and reciprocity are fundamental interactions in the development of ethological and social behaviors involving at least dyads of organisms or human individuals under shared contingencies. In human beings, reciprocity, attachment, and prosocial behaviors will be part of interindividual interactions as institutional practices.

This Research Topic welcomes original experimental or observational research and conceptual papers on topics related to reciprocity, attachment, minimal social interactions (dyads or small groups), prosocial behaviors, altruism, and competence, treated from psychology, different disciplines, and multidisciplinary contributions. Editors suggest, but not limit contributions referred to:
- Attachment and development
- Conceptual reflections about attachment, reciprocity and/or prosocial behavior
- Methodological problems in the analysis of attachment, reciprocity and/or social behavior
- Attachment and cultural practices
- Experimental approximations to attachment, reciprocity and/or prosocial behaviors
- Altruism in animal and human behavior
- Reciprocity and social behavior
- Experimental establishment of reciprocity
- Animal and human altruism
- Cross-cultural differences in altruism and reciprocity
- Research on parent-child attachment
- Research on indirect reciprocity
- Assymetric reciprocity

Keywords: Social interactions, Reciprocity, Attachment, Prosocial Behaviors, Human behavior, Animal Behavior


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The conventional nature of social behavior, conceived as interactions among individuals based on the exchange of specialized labor, products, and accumulated wealth, distinguishes human behavior from animal behavior. Nevertheless, those animal species in which neonates are born immature share with human beings a similar (not identical) nurturing process based on biological dependency: attachment. Speciation and socialization are the processes that take place, initially through attachment to caregivers in the natural and cultural environments, respectively. Attachment consists of a longitudinal process in which, through minimal (i.e., small scale or subtle) dyadic or triadic interactions, newborn individuals become affiliated to their species-specific group and ecological niche and the particular family group and cultural surroundings. Individuals learn specific response patterns (natural language in the case of humans), share common affective reactions to others’ behaviors, and recognize familiar and strange stimulus objects in the environment determining their approach/withdrawal tendencies. These processes promote reciprocity regarding other individuals in the group and determine the outgrowth of prosocial/antisocial behaviors critical for speciation and socialization. Prosocial behaviors, such as cooperation, altruism, competition, and others, are prior in evolution to the emergence of human societies and may be considered a functional antecedent for its arising when language was invented.

Minimal (i.e., small scale or subtle) interindividual interactions involve, in the case of attachment of a mature or older conspecific or member of the group which shapes and promotes the establishment of relevant ecological and social behaviors, fundamental of survival in animals, and for living together and subsistence in human beings. The analysis of attachment in terms of minimal interactions allows for a fine grain analysis of individual affiliation to species-specific and cultural behaviors.
Reciprocity, attachment, and prosocial behaviors such as cooperation involving altruism, or competition, are topics approached from several theoretical paradigms and disciplines. Psychology itself has analyzed these topics from different conceptual positions: social, evolutionary, economic, ethological, and anthropological, by mentioning some examples. In some cases, these approaches may complement each other, but in other cases, unfortunately, similarities are only terminological.
This Research Topic aims to showcase a wide diversity of work in this area, which is relevant because prosocial behaviors, attachment, and reciprocity are fundamental interactions in the development of ethological and social behaviors involving at least dyads of organisms or human individuals under shared contingencies. In human beings, reciprocity, attachment, and prosocial behaviors will be part of interindividual interactions as institutional practices.

This Research Topic welcomes original experimental or observational research and conceptual papers on topics related to reciprocity, attachment, minimal social interactions (dyads or small groups), prosocial behaviors, altruism, and competence, treated from psychology, different disciplines, and multidisciplinary contributions. Editors suggest, but not limit contributions referred to:
- Attachment and development
- Conceptual reflections about attachment, reciprocity and/or prosocial behavior
- Methodological problems in the analysis of attachment, reciprocity and/or social behavior
- Attachment and cultural practices
- Experimental approximations to attachment, reciprocity and/or prosocial behaviors
- Altruism in animal and human behavior
- Reciprocity and social behavior
- Experimental establishment of reciprocity
- Animal and human altruism
- Cross-cultural differences in altruism and reciprocity
- Research on parent-child attachment
- Research on indirect reciprocity
- Assymetric reciprocity

Keywords: Social interactions, Reciprocity, Attachment, Prosocial Behaviors, Human behavior, Animal Behavior


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Topic Coordinators

Loading..

Articles

Sort by:

Loading..

Authors

Loading..

views

total views views downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Share on

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.