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About this Research Topic

Manuscript Submission Deadline 20 January 2023

With the rising demand of fabricated human body parts, also known as medical implants and/or devices, the manufacturing industry is being challenged to introduce new and more effective approaches to meet the required standards. In this regard, currently, a vast variety of biomaterials have been developed for the production of these medical implants. Modern implantable biomaterials display enhanced properties and can be tailored for a particular medical need. Among the various material processing technologies available for medical applications, subtractive manufacturing is one of the most widely applied approaches to achieve the desired surface quality standards and the required geometrical features. However, the subtractive manufactured surfaces are expected to exhibit structural compatibility with improved functional performance, life, and sustainability within the human body. Therefore, the selection of the machining process and optimization of the cutting parameters are of key importance to meet the desired requirements.

The dimensional tolerances, surface properties, and response of an engineered medical device in the midst of a specific biological surrounding, can be primarily ascertained by the effectiveness of the applied manufacturing techniques. In this context, a large number of existing studies in the broader literature have examined the processing mainly of metallic alloys, ceramic, composite biomaterials. However, a closer look to the literature reveals a number of gaps and shortcomings in terms of machining of limited number of biomaterials and processing methods. Moreover, a relatively narrower range of studies confirming the improved biocompatibility after the necessary tests, have been reported in the case of traditional machining methods compared to the non-traditional ones. Furthermore, a rising trend in the micro-machining of biomaterials has recently been noticed, with the goal of achieving miniaturized medical implant/components. Therefore, this Research Topic seeks to address the areas in this field that are still unstudied and or not sufficiently explored, focusing on newest innovations in subtractive manufacturing of biomaterials for medical implant applications.

We warmly welcome submissions in the form of original research, review, short communication, and perspective articles around, but not limited to, the following topics of interest:

• Traditional and non-traditional machining processes
• Development of new concepts, processes, and systems for the manufacturing of biomaterials for medical implant applications
• Application of sustainable and green manufacturing focusing on the incorporation of Cryogenic Coolants or Liquid Nitrogen as a cutting fluid
• Application of evolutionary computing approaches in manufacturing processes
• Characterization of machined biomaterials surfaces using advanced techniques such as FESEM, EDS, TEM, EBSD, Raman spectroscopy etc. to project the factors regulating the manufacturing operations
• Micro and nano-fabrication
• Surface modification using material removal processes

Keywords: Machining, Sustainable Manufacturing, Biomaterials, Surface Integrity, Biocompatibility


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

With the rising demand of fabricated human body parts, also known as medical implants and/or devices, the manufacturing industry is being challenged to introduce new and more effective approaches to meet the required standards. In this regard, currently, a vast variety of biomaterials have been developed for the production of these medical implants. Modern implantable biomaterials display enhanced properties and can be tailored for a particular medical need. Among the various material processing technologies available for medical applications, subtractive manufacturing is one of the most widely applied approaches to achieve the desired surface quality standards and the required geometrical features. However, the subtractive manufactured surfaces are expected to exhibit structural compatibility with improved functional performance, life, and sustainability within the human body. Therefore, the selection of the machining process and optimization of the cutting parameters are of key importance to meet the desired requirements.

The dimensional tolerances, surface properties, and response of an engineered medical device in the midst of a specific biological surrounding, can be primarily ascertained by the effectiveness of the applied manufacturing techniques. In this context, a large number of existing studies in the broader literature have examined the processing mainly of metallic alloys, ceramic, composite biomaterials. However, a closer look to the literature reveals a number of gaps and shortcomings in terms of machining of limited number of biomaterials and processing methods. Moreover, a relatively narrower range of studies confirming the improved biocompatibility after the necessary tests, have been reported in the case of traditional machining methods compared to the non-traditional ones. Furthermore, a rising trend in the micro-machining of biomaterials has recently been noticed, with the goal of achieving miniaturized medical implant/components. Therefore, this Research Topic seeks to address the areas in this field that are still unstudied and or not sufficiently explored, focusing on newest innovations in subtractive manufacturing of biomaterials for medical implant applications.

We warmly welcome submissions in the form of original research, review, short communication, and perspective articles around, but not limited to, the following topics of interest:

• Traditional and non-traditional machining processes
• Development of new concepts, processes, and systems for the manufacturing of biomaterials for medical implant applications
• Application of sustainable and green manufacturing focusing on the incorporation of Cryogenic Coolants or Liquid Nitrogen as a cutting fluid
• Application of evolutionary computing approaches in manufacturing processes
• Characterization of machined biomaterials surfaces using advanced techniques such as FESEM, EDS, TEM, EBSD, Raman spectroscopy etc. to project the factors regulating the manufacturing operations
• Micro and nano-fabrication
• Surface modification using material removal processes

Keywords: Machining, Sustainable Manufacturing, Biomaterials, Surface Integrity, Biocompatibility


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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