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Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) consist of Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, and Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions in U.S. higher education. Unlike predominantly white institutions (PWIs), MSIs have adapted their curriculum approaches for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) student populations to serve, improve and increase degree attainment. MSIs curriculum is effective due to assessment driven practices,
meeting students where they are, and collaboration which is key to serving their students holistically. Most importantly, MSIs are culturally relevant to the populations they serve. Student learning must center students' culture and identities, and is the core component of culturally relevant pedagogies that support student achievement while maintaining their cultural identities.

To frame this Research Topic we draw upon Body-Soul Rooted Pedagogy (Desai et al., 2019) as our conceptual beginning point. Body-Soul Rooted Pedagogy is a “a soulful and living pedagogical framework wherein teaching, learning, and knowing take root within body/spirit/land epistemologies of resistance, resilience, and wholeness.” We view MSIs as sites that have curated pedagogical spaces that center the connection between body/spirit/land for BIPOC students. We seek manuscripts that examine how students, faculty, staff, and administrators employ Body-Soul Rooted Pedagogy through the use of Ethnic Studies curriculum at MSIs to nurture student well-being. In comparison to PWI’s, MSIs lead in educating and serving BIPOC students especially in STEM, yet are not often studied to examine what other institutional types, administrators, faculty, staff, and students can learn from their best practices.

We seek manuscripts that address student well-being in innovative ways that center Ethnic Studies curriculum and what are the pedagogical practices students, faculty, staff, or administrators employ using body/spirit/land epistemologies at MSIs. Manuscripts should identify the MSI and historical context, define that type of Ethnic Studies curriculum they draw from, the students they serve, and what best practices have proven to be effective. We are interested in manuscripts that address how student epistemologies are sustained and held of value within the MSI context.

Keywords: Minority Serving Institutions, Ethnic Studies, Higher Education, Student Well-Being


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) consist of Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, and Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions in U.S. higher education. Unlike predominantly white institutions (PWIs), MSIs have adapted their curriculum approaches for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) student populations to serve, improve and increase degree attainment. MSIs curriculum is effective due to assessment driven practices,
meeting students where they are, and collaboration which is key to serving their students holistically. Most importantly, MSIs are culturally relevant to the populations they serve. Student learning must center students' culture and identities, and is the core component of culturally relevant pedagogies that support student achievement while maintaining their cultural identities.

To frame this Research Topic we draw upon Body-Soul Rooted Pedagogy (Desai et al., 2019) as our conceptual beginning point. Body-Soul Rooted Pedagogy is a “a soulful and living pedagogical framework wherein teaching, learning, and knowing take root within body/spirit/land epistemologies of resistance, resilience, and wholeness.” We view MSIs as sites that have curated pedagogical spaces that center the connection between body/spirit/land for BIPOC students. We seek manuscripts that examine how students, faculty, staff, and administrators employ Body-Soul Rooted Pedagogy through the use of Ethnic Studies curriculum at MSIs to nurture student well-being. In comparison to PWI’s, MSIs lead in educating and serving BIPOC students especially in STEM, yet are not often studied to examine what other institutional types, administrators, faculty, staff, and students can learn from their best practices.

We seek manuscripts that address student well-being in innovative ways that center Ethnic Studies curriculum and what are the pedagogical practices students, faculty, staff, or administrators employ using body/spirit/land epistemologies at MSIs. Manuscripts should identify the MSI and historical context, define that type of Ethnic Studies curriculum they draw from, the students they serve, and what best practices have proven to be effective. We are interested in manuscripts that address how student epistemologies are sustained and held of value within the MSI context.

Keywords: Minority Serving Institutions, Ethnic Studies, Higher Education, Student Well-Being


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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