Research Topic

Time Patterns and their Functions in Human Neuroscience

  • Submission closed.

About this Research Topic

This topic aims to contribute to a greater understanding of time patterns and their functions in human neuroscience (including implications for medicine, psychiatry, psychology, education and other fields). Research that identifies a significant time pattern, demonstrates the functional importance of a ...

This topic aims to contribute to a greater understanding of time patterns and their functions in human neuroscience (including implications for medicine, psychiatry, psychology, education and other fields). Research that identifies a significant time pattern, demonstrates the functional importance of a pattern (or interacting time patterns), or reports on applications of time patterns in novel contexts would be of particular interest.

By way of illustration only, consider the many time patterns that impact on learning and memory in adolescence. Time patterns are central in learning and memory; circadian rhythms and sleep; and human nervous system development. Some of these time patterns trigger responses that occur in very short periods of time (late Long-term Potentiation) yet can have long term consequences (memories can last a lifetime). 24-hour time patterns of circadian rhythms and sleep can directly impact on learning, health and mental health in adolescence. It recently has been suggested that time patterns in adolescence show gene, environment, and time interactions that impact directly in the onset of mental illness.

Identifying specific timing patterns can be complex. In part this is because of the very different time scales simultaneously in play. Time patterns in learning and memory include elements that are conserved through evolution (the activation of CREB) and operate in minutes. CREB activation itself can be triggered by specific time patterns.

Demonstrating the functional importance of timing patterns precisely is of vital importance. For example circadian and sleep patterns impact on cognitive, emotional and somatic functioning. When circadian and sleep patterns in adolescence are synchronizing to external timing patters (such as the start of the school day), their impact on cognitive, emotional and somatic functions is positive. When they are desynchronized, the impact is negative.

These patterns are, of course, only a single example. There are many other aspects of human neuroscience in which time patterns are of critical importance. We welcome submissions from researchers in any area where time patterns and their functions are of significance in human neuroscience.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recent Articles

Loading..

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top