Skip to main content

About this Research Topic

Manuscript Submission Deadline 30 April 2023

Negative partisanship - the intense disdain for a rival political party - has been on the rise in the U.S. and beyond with significant consequences: Instead of enthusiastically supporting a political party, many voters use their vote to signal their fierce rejection of a political opponent. Indeed, many citizens feel at best lukewarm about their own party, while the disdain toward the opposing party is steadily intensifying. In the U.S., even partisan leaners justify their support for one of the political parties with their opposition to the other. This affective asymmetry suggests that hostility towards the opposing party is not conditional upon strong in-party attachments. Indeed, evidence suggests that negative partisanship can exist and exert influence on political behavior independently of strong positive identification with a political party. While increasing negativity is certainly an undesirable trend from a normative standpoint, the distinction and uncoupling of positive and negative partisanship also offers a positive outlook: If negative and positive partisanship are not necessarily intertwined, partisans are able to strongly support their own party without vilifying the other.

This Research Topic centers on this insight and welcomes contributions that focus on the development and measurement of negative partisanship, its (de-)alignment with positive partisanship, as well as its impact on political behavior and attitudes, including negative partisans’ commitment to democratic norms and values. Contributions that examine negative partisanship in a comparative context are especially encouraged.

Possible contributions cover issues that include (but are not limited to):

• How can we promote positive partisanship without negative partisanship?
• How can promote the de-alignment of positive and negative partisanship?
• How do different measures of negative partisanship compare to each other?
• What kind of electoral systems are associated with higher levels of negative partisanship and why?
• What kind of political parties are more likely to elicit negative partisanship and why?
• What are the political and social consequences of negative partisanship?
• Under what conditions is negative partisanship associated with violence and weakened support for democratic norms?
• How is negative partisanship related to candidate evaluations?
• To what extent does negative partisanship reflect an opposition toward political parties in general? How can we distinguish between the two?

Possible contributions using the following methodological approaches are especially welcome:

• Experimental and quasi-experimental methods
• Econometric methods
• Panel data approaches
• Text analysis

This Research Topic welcomes the submission of research papers and abstracts which describe original work that has not been submitted or is currently under review, has not been previously published nor accepted for publication elsewhere, in any other journal.

Keywords: negative partisanship, partisan identity, party identification, social identity, negativity


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Negative partisanship - the intense disdain for a rival political party - has been on the rise in the U.S. and beyond with significant consequences: Instead of enthusiastically supporting a political party, many voters use their vote to signal their fierce rejection of a political opponent. Indeed, many citizens feel at best lukewarm about their own party, while the disdain toward the opposing party is steadily intensifying. In the U.S., even partisan leaners justify their support for one of the political parties with their opposition to the other. This affective asymmetry suggests that hostility towards the opposing party is not conditional upon strong in-party attachments. Indeed, evidence suggests that negative partisanship can exist and exert influence on political behavior independently of strong positive identification with a political party. While increasing negativity is certainly an undesirable trend from a normative standpoint, the distinction and uncoupling of positive and negative partisanship also offers a positive outlook: If negative and positive partisanship are not necessarily intertwined, partisans are able to strongly support their own party without vilifying the other.

This Research Topic centers on this insight and welcomes contributions that focus on the development and measurement of negative partisanship, its (de-)alignment with positive partisanship, as well as its impact on political behavior and attitudes, including negative partisans’ commitment to democratic norms and values. Contributions that examine negative partisanship in a comparative context are especially encouraged.

Possible contributions cover issues that include (but are not limited to):

• How can we promote positive partisanship without negative partisanship?
• How can promote the de-alignment of positive and negative partisanship?
• How do different measures of negative partisanship compare to each other?
• What kind of electoral systems are associated with higher levels of negative partisanship and why?
• What kind of political parties are more likely to elicit negative partisanship and why?
• What are the political and social consequences of negative partisanship?
• Under what conditions is negative partisanship associated with violence and weakened support for democratic norms?
• How is negative partisanship related to candidate evaluations?
• To what extent does negative partisanship reflect an opposition toward political parties in general? How can we distinguish between the two?

Possible contributions using the following methodological approaches are especially welcome:

• Experimental and quasi-experimental methods
• Econometric methods
• Panel data approaches
• Text analysis

This Research Topic welcomes the submission of research papers and abstracts which describe original work that has not been submitted or is currently under review, has not been previously published nor accepted for publication elsewhere, in any other journal.

Keywords: negative partisanship, partisan identity, party identification, social identity, negativity


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Topic Coordinators

Loading..

Articles

Sort by:

Loading..

Authors

Loading..

views

total views views downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Share on

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.