Research Topic

Microtubular Ceramic Fuel Cells

  • Submission closed.

About this Research Topic

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are well known electrochemical devices that directly convert the chemical energy of a wide variety of fuels (H2, CO, hydrocarbons, alcohols, etc.) into electricity. Regarding their geometry, microtubular SOFCs (mSOFCs) are more appropriate for portable applications, as they present rapid start-up times, easy sealings and strong resistance to thermal cycling. They can be also used in reverse mode to produce hydrogen by steam electrolysis, or syngas by the coelectrolysis of steam and CO2. In addition, microtubular cells can be used as catalytic membranes combining reaction and separation in the same unit. This configuration presents potential benefits such as increased reaction rate, selectivity, yield, etc. and can be coupled for a wide range of reactions.

The present research topic aims to cover all different aspects related to microtubular ceramic cells, including for example the development of innovative fabrication methods, the integration of novel materials (electrodes, ionic/protonic conductors, current collectors, etc.) into microtubular SOFC devices, design of stacks, use of alternative fuels, modelling (thermos-mechanical, multiscale, CFD, etc.), or economic analysis of mSOFC systems. Special focus will be given on improving the electrochemical performance and assuring a long term stability of the cells, for all the aforementioned applications i.e. fuel cell, electrolysis, coelectrolysis and membrane reactors.


Keywords: Microtubular, SOFC, SOEC, ceramic reactor, fuel cells


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are well known electrochemical devices that directly convert the chemical energy of a wide variety of fuels (H2, CO, hydrocarbons, alcohols, etc.) into electricity. Regarding their geometry, microtubular SOFCs (mSOFCs) are more appropriate for portable applications, as they present rapid start-up times, easy sealings and strong resistance to thermal cycling. They can be also used in reverse mode to produce hydrogen by steam electrolysis, or syngas by the coelectrolysis of steam and CO2. In addition, microtubular cells can be used as catalytic membranes combining reaction and separation in the same unit. This configuration presents potential benefits such as increased reaction rate, selectivity, yield, etc. and can be coupled for a wide range of reactions.

The present research topic aims to cover all different aspects related to microtubular ceramic cells, including for example the development of innovative fabrication methods, the integration of novel materials (electrodes, ionic/protonic conductors, current collectors, etc.) into microtubular SOFC devices, design of stacks, use of alternative fuels, modelling (thermos-mechanical, multiscale, CFD, etc.), or economic analysis of mSOFC systems. Special focus will be given on improving the electrochemical performance and assuring a long term stability of the cells, for all the aforementioned applications i.e. fuel cell, electrolysis, coelectrolysis and membrane reactors.


Keywords: Microtubular, SOFC, SOEC, ceramic reactor, fuel cells


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

Submission closed.

Participating Journals

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top