Skip to main content

About this Research Topic

Manuscript Submission Deadline 26 August 2023

Degradation is apparent in all things and is fundamental to both manufactured and natural objects. It is often described by the second law of thermodynamics, where entropy, a measure of disorder, tends to increase with time in a closed system. Simply said things age. The natural aging and degradation of materials have been a subject of study by engineers and scientists for many, many years. But with the demands placed on new engineered materials and devices for micro-electronic applications, the degradation of such over time has become more and more crucial and became known as reliability. Here, physics-of-failure approaches are to be replaced by physics-of-degradation techniques that will allow the industry to indicate the remaining lifetime of the products.

Degradation is apparent in naturally occurring materials and structures as well as human-engineered materials and devices. In everyday experience, it is the ever-present phenomena of spontaneous loss of some quality, functionality, and order. This loss of order or degradation has many terms or phrases to label the phenomena, such as aging, deterioration, devolution, and ear-out. It is this degradation in electronics that this special issue will explore. It will present a state-of-the-art understanding of material degradation and its effects on the reliability of micro-electronics. Understanding the physics of degradation will also reduce the amount (and cost) of product release testing. The special issue intends to give new findings in analysis, techniques, and methodologies to study, analyze and/or predict the degradation of materials on the nano, micro, and mesa scale. This also includes the development of analytical and numerical techniques that describe the phenomena on these scales.

Specific topics for this special issue, but not limited to, are listed:

• Multi-scale & multi-physics simulations for physics of degradation.
• Smart censoring and big data analysis.
• Reliable materials and (smart) accelerated reliability testing.
• Diagnostics, prognostics, and Health Management, digital twin for lifetime monitoring.

In order to analyze, understand and predict the degradation of materials on the nano, micro, and mesa scale.

Keywords: Materials, Degradation, Lifetime, Reliability, Semiconductors


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Degradation is apparent in all things and is fundamental to both manufactured and natural objects. It is often described by the second law of thermodynamics, where entropy, a measure of disorder, tends to increase with time in a closed system. Simply said things age. The natural aging and degradation of materials have been a subject of study by engineers and scientists for many, many years. But with the demands placed on new engineered materials and devices for micro-electronic applications, the degradation of such over time has become more and more crucial and became known as reliability. Here, physics-of-failure approaches are to be replaced by physics-of-degradation techniques that will allow the industry to indicate the remaining lifetime of the products.

Degradation is apparent in naturally occurring materials and structures as well as human-engineered materials and devices. In everyday experience, it is the ever-present phenomena of spontaneous loss of some quality, functionality, and order. This loss of order or degradation has many terms or phrases to label the phenomena, such as aging, deterioration, devolution, and ear-out. It is this degradation in electronics that this special issue will explore. It will present a state-of-the-art understanding of material degradation and its effects on the reliability of micro-electronics. Understanding the physics of degradation will also reduce the amount (and cost) of product release testing. The special issue intends to give new findings in analysis, techniques, and methodologies to study, analyze and/or predict the degradation of materials on the nano, micro, and mesa scale. This also includes the development of analytical and numerical techniques that describe the phenomena on these scales.

Specific topics for this special issue, but not limited to, are listed:

• Multi-scale & multi-physics simulations for physics of degradation.
• Smart censoring and big data analysis.
• Reliable materials and (smart) accelerated reliability testing.
• Diagnostics, prognostics, and Health Management, digital twin for lifetime monitoring.

In order to analyze, understand and predict the degradation of materials on the nano, micro, and mesa scale.

Keywords: Materials, Degradation, Lifetime, Reliability, Semiconductors


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Topic Coordinators

Loading..

Articles

Sort by:

Loading..

Authors

Loading..

views

total views views downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.