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About this Research Topic

Abstract Submission Deadline 16 March 2023
Manuscript Submission Deadline 16 June 2023

Recurrent Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are common in those suffering from HIV, with this co-infection, or triplex, becoming a serious public health problem. Unlike co-infection with HIV and HBV, which does not affect the risk of prenatal complications, in the case of co-infection with HIV and HCV, there is a higher percentage of pregnancy complications when compared to HIV infection only. These co-infections are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and a higher risk of obstetrical complications, including preeclampsia, stillbirth, preterm delivery, and low birth weight, ultimately resulting in a higher rate of emergency cesarean sections.

While the proportion of pregnant women with triplex infection may be less, the amalgam of HIV, HBV, and HCV is an unwarrantable co-existence, and one that may devise damaging consequences on pregnant women and mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) rates. The potential for such infections to cause hepatotoxicity is also a matter of concern and needs consideration when planning the management of such infections. Thus, the triplex infection of HIV, HBV, and HCV among pregnant women is a cause for concern.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has trademarked the global get-up-and-go of eliminating viral hepatitis infections by setting targets for achieving substantial reductions in new infections and mortalities from HIV and viral hepatitis by 2030. Recommendations by the WHO include viral hepatitis elimination in 2030 and triple elimination in pregnant women, albeit not including hepatitis C. There have been key breaches in this international HIV and viral hepatitis elimination effort, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Authorities investigating HIV and viral hepatitis have identified gaps and challenges, and have noted that there should be evidence-based research precedencies on epidemiological studies in pregnant and non-pregnant women.

In support of this, this Research Topic welcomes papers on the following topics:
1. Triplex and dual infections of HIV, HBV, and HCV in pregnancy
2. Mother-to-child transmission of HIV, HBV, or HCV
3. Antiviral therapy for HIV, HBV, and HCV infections in pregnancy
4. Seroprevalence, seroclearance, and seroconversion of HIV, HBV, or HCV infections in women’s health
5. Hepatoxicities in HIV, HBV, and HCV in pregnancy and puerperium
6. Antiviral drug reactions in pregnancies.

Keywords: Hepatitis B virus, HBV, Hepatitis C virus, HCV, hepatotoxicity, human immune deficiency virus, infection


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Recurrent Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are common in those suffering from HIV, with this co-infection, or triplex, becoming a serious public health problem. Unlike co-infection with HIV and HBV, which does not affect the risk of prenatal complications, in the case of co-infection with HIV and HCV, there is a higher percentage of pregnancy complications when compared to HIV infection only. These co-infections are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and a higher risk of obstetrical complications, including preeclampsia, stillbirth, preterm delivery, and low birth weight, ultimately resulting in a higher rate of emergency cesarean sections.

While the proportion of pregnant women with triplex infection may be less, the amalgam of HIV, HBV, and HCV is an unwarrantable co-existence, and one that may devise damaging consequences on pregnant women and mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) rates. The potential for such infections to cause hepatotoxicity is also a matter of concern and needs consideration when planning the management of such infections. Thus, the triplex infection of HIV, HBV, and HCV among pregnant women is a cause for concern.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has trademarked the global get-up-and-go of eliminating viral hepatitis infections by setting targets for achieving substantial reductions in new infections and mortalities from HIV and viral hepatitis by 2030. Recommendations by the WHO include viral hepatitis elimination in 2030 and triple elimination in pregnant women, albeit not including hepatitis C. There have been key breaches in this international HIV and viral hepatitis elimination effort, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Authorities investigating HIV and viral hepatitis have identified gaps and challenges, and have noted that there should be evidence-based research precedencies on epidemiological studies in pregnant and non-pregnant women.

In support of this, this Research Topic welcomes papers on the following topics:
1. Triplex and dual infections of HIV, HBV, and HCV in pregnancy
2. Mother-to-child transmission of HIV, HBV, or HCV
3. Antiviral therapy for HIV, HBV, and HCV infections in pregnancy
4. Seroprevalence, seroclearance, and seroconversion of HIV, HBV, or HCV infections in women’s health
5. Hepatoxicities in HIV, HBV, and HCV in pregnancy and puerperium
6. Antiviral drug reactions in pregnancies.

Keywords: Hepatitis B virus, HBV, Hepatitis C virus, HCV, hepatotoxicity, human immune deficiency virus, infection


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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