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About this Research Topic

Manuscript Submission Deadline 15 May 2023

Social behaviors are composed of more adaptive processes, such as learning, cognition, and empathy, than instinctive behaviors.

In addition to the chemical, and optical cues that mainly trigger instinctive behaviors, dietary components, and the microbiological environment can represent dominant factors of these adaptive processes with special reference to the treatment of social abnormality symptoms, including weak depression, social phobia, and withdrawal from social contact.

Multiple factors in the gastrointestinal tract, such as peptides, glycans, fatty acids, steroids, polyphenols, and other metabolites originating from dietary ingredients, and symbiotic microorganisms, have been found to influence animals’ behavior in a humoral fashion. For instance, tryptophan-related metabolites, such as serotonin (5HT), nicotinamide dinucleotide (NAD), and indole derivatives, have been shown to influence mental status, enteric nerve, and gut bacteria in the context of depression treatment. Multiple targets of these molecules were identified; 5HT receptors, NAD-dependent enzymes, and nuclear receptors, however the responsibility of each molecule to the symptom should be carefully examined from the aspect trans-omical biology.

Because the concentrations of these factors in the brain, circulating system, and peripheral organs are influenced by the balance between the supply and the host metabolism, trans-omical approaches such as the combinations of microbiomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics prove effective for investigating the underlying mechanisms.

The goal of this Research Topic is to broaden our knowledge and investigate the mechanisms by which humoral factors derived from the gastrointestinal tract, influence social behavior through a finely tuned balance regulation between the host metabolism and supply targeting specific neurons in both animal models and humans.

The aim is to collect molecular-based investigations to identify the candidate targets, such as neurons and receptor molecules, impacted by changes at the level of the concentration balance of humoral factors. These should be validated via genetic, optogenetics, and selective drug assays in both human and animal model studies.

We welcome submissions investigating the role of humoral factors in circulation and impact at the level of the CNS and PNS, by addressing the following, with a molecular focus:

• Refinement or development of behavioral assay systems allowing for the detection of subtle deviations from normal behavior. This technical development will help find dietary factors and microorganisms that can ameliorate pre-disease status.

• Description and interpretation of omical responses of symbiotic microorganisms and host organs to the humoral factors.

• Identification of critical humoral factors for the regulation of behavioral outcome.

• Identification of neuronal or molecular targets of critical humoral factors such as GPCRs for short chain fatty acids.

• Validation of neurons or molecules responsible for a specific behavioral phenotype.

• Studies about social behaviors focusing on the dietary environment, individual differences, sex, and stage of life

Keywords: polyphenol, nuclear receptor, steroid hormone, GPCR


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Social behaviors are composed of more adaptive processes, such as learning, cognition, and empathy, than instinctive behaviors.

In addition to the chemical, and optical cues that mainly trigger instinctive behaviors, dietary components, and the microbiological environment can represent dominant factors of these adaptive processes with special reference to the treatment of social abnormality symptoms, including weak depression, social phobia, and withdrawal from social contact.

Multiple factors in the gastrointestinal tract, such as peptides, glycans, fatty acids, steroids, polyphenols, and other metabolites originating from dietary ingredients, and symbiotic microorganisms, have been found to influence animals’ behavior in a humoral fashion. For instance, tryptophan-related metabolites, such as serotonin (5HT), nicotinamide dinucleotide (NAD), and indole derivatives, have been shown to influence mental status, enteric nerve, and gut bacteria in the context of depression treatment. Multiple targets of these molecules were identified; 5HT receptors, NAD-dependent enzymes, and nuclear receptors, however the responsibility of each molecule to the symptom should be carefully examined from the aspect trans-omical biology.

Because the concentrations of these factors in the brain, circulating system, and peripheral organs are influenced by the balance between the supply and the host metabolism, trans-omical approaches such as the combinations of microbiomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics prove effective for investigating the underlying mechanisms.

The goal of this Research Topic is to broaden our knowledge and investigate the mechanisms by which humoral factors derived from the gastrointestinal tract, influence social behavior through a finely tuned balance regulation between the host metabolism and supply targeting specific neurons in both animal models and humans.

The aim is to collect molecular-based investigations to identify the candidate targets, such as neurons and receptor molecules, impacted by changes at the level of the concentration balance of humoral factors. These should be validated via genetic, optogenetics, and selective drug assays in both human and animal model studies.

We welcome submissions investigating the role of humoral factors in circulation and impact at the level of the CNS and PNS, by addressing the following, with a molecular focus:

• Refinement or development of behavioral assay systems allowing for the detection of subtle deviations from normal behavior. This technical development will help find dietary factors and microorganisms that can ameliorate pre-disease status.

• Description and interpretation of omical responses of symbiotic microorganisms and host organs to the humoral factors.

• Identification of critical humoral factors for the regulation of behavioral outcome.

• Identification of neuronal or molecular targets of critical humoral factors such as GPCRs for short chain fatty acids.

• Validation of neurons or molecules responsible for a specific behavioral phenotype.

• Studies about social behaviors focusing on the dietary environment, individual differences, sex, and stage of life

Keywords: polyphenol, nuclear receptor, steroid hormone, GPCR


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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