Research Topic

Social Status and Fertility

About this Research Topic

In this Research Topic we aim to elucidate the relationship between status and reproduction in modern humans. We will emphasize an evolutionary perspective, including evolutionary life history and gene-cultural co-evolution, encompassing a wide range of approaches as for instance archaeological and historical evidence, evidence form population and behavioral genetics, evidence from primate societies.

In particular, we aim to stress the following issues:
• How the relationship differs by sex: differences in fertility outcomes according to status for men and women
• The sociology of social status and reproduction: how the relationship differs by status indicator (e.g., education, income, property and wealth, occupation) and fertility indicator (e.g., number of children, childlessness, age at first birth)
• How the relationship differs between pre- and post-demographic transition societies: does this relationship contribute to the explanation of the demographic transition?
     - Comparison between traditional societies, pre-industrial, and modern societies
     - Evidence from the period of the demographic transition and the post-transition phase until the 21 century
     - Current fertility trends in the developed and the developing world associated with social status
     - The consequences of evolutionary accounts on human fertility and social status for future demographic developments
• Transgenerational effects:
     - How status is passed on from one generation to the next?
     - Does status exert fitness effects over generations?
• Miscellaneous:
     -The interaction between religion, social status and fertility
     - Effects of migration on the relationship between status and reproduction: social status and historical and modern migration
     - The impact of homogamy along status characteristics on human fertility

Evidence can come from different approaches:
• Evidence from modern societies
• Archaeological and historic evidence
• Evidence from primate societies: primate social hierarchies and fertility
• Evidence from genetics: archeo-genetics, population genetics, behavioral genetics, (possibly epigenetics)

In this Research Topic we aim to integrate these different aspects and approaches. Hence, manuscripts that succeed to integrate different aspects are particularly welcome. Also an aim is to discuss applicable consequences that could support political decisions. We welcome both theoretical and empirical contributions, aiming a “good mixture” between theoretical and empirical contributions.


Keywords: evolution, social status, reproduction, fertility, sex, genetics, gene-culture co- evolution, life-history, homogamy, demographic development, post-demographic transition societies, applied demographics


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

In this Research Topic we aim to elucidate the relationship between status and reproduction in modern humans. We will emphasize an evolutionary perspective, including evolutionary life history and gene-cultural co-evolution, encompassing a wide range of approaches as for instance archaeological and historical evidence, evidence form population and behavioral genetics, evidence from primate societies.

In particular, we aim to stress the following issues:
• How the relationship differs by sex: differences in fertility outcomes according to status for men and women
• The sociology of social status and reproduction: how the relationship differs by status indicator (e.g., education, income, property and wealth, occupation) and fertility indicator (e.g., number of children, childlessness, age at first birth)
• How the relationship differs between pre- and post-demographic transition societies: does this relationship contribute to the explanation of the demographic transition?
     - Comparison between traditional societies, pre-industrial, and modern societies
     - Evidence from the period of the demographic transition and the post-transition phase until the 21 century
     - Current fertility trends in the developed and the developing world associated with social status
     - The consequences of evolutionary accounts on human fertility and social status for future demographic developments
• Transgenerational effects:
     - How status is passed on from one generation to the next?
     - Does status exert fitness effects over generations?
• Miscellaneous:
     -The interaction between religion, social status and fertility
     - Effects of migration on the relationship between status and reproduction: social status and historical and modern migration
     - The impact of homogamy along status characteristics on human fertility

Evidence can come from different approaches:
• Evidence from modern societies
• Archaeological and historic evidence
• Evidence from primate societies: primate social hierarchies and fertility
• Evidence from genetics: archeo-genetics, population genetics, behavioral genetics, (possibly epigenetics)

In this Research Topic we aim to integrate these different aspects and approaches. Hence, manuscripts that succeed to integrate different aspects are particularly welcome. Also an aim is to discuss applicable consequences that could support political decisions. We welcome both theoretical and empirical contributions, aiming a “good mixture” between theoretical and empirical contributions.


Keywords: evolution, social status, reproduction, fertility, sex, genetics, gene-culture co- evolution, life-history, homogamy, demographic development, post-demographic transition societies, applied demographics


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

30 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

30 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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