Skip to main content

About this Research Topic

Abstract Submission Deadline 30 April 2023
Manuscript Submission Deadline 31 August 2023

Neuroplasticity is a concept that has come to encompass many different phenomena, from neurogenesis to synaptogenesis, including psychological and behavioral flexibility. However, the translational links from the molecular level to psychiatric intervention remain imprecise. Additionally, neuroplasticity has both been equated with the mechanism of action for psychiatric treatments on the one hand and described as needing to be paired with therapeutic non-pharmacologic interventions on the other.

This debate is becoming increasingly relevant to this moment in psychedelic research in which there are diverse clinical approaches being conceived and trialed. While the predominant paradigm in psychedelic clinical trials emphasizes a supervised psychedelic experience as central to the intervention, there are also several "non-hallucinogen" psychedelics in the pipeline that aim to isolate the neuroplastic effects of the compounds without the subjective experience. Furthermore, some argue that the extrapharmacologic components of the treatment are superfluous. The paradigm of psychedelic clinical trials in the past decade has been much different than that of traditional psychopharmacology—rather than a medication being taken every day, the compound is administered only once or a few times and is embedded within a psychotherapy process. But as a novel class of non-hallucinogenic psychedelic analogs is continuing along the pipeline towards clinical experimentation, the question urgently arises—how should the induction of neuroplasticity be clinically harnessed for safe and therapeutic use?

The goal of this Research Topic is to start bridging a pre-clinical and clinical understanding of how to measure and harness neuroplasticity in psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy treatments, by combining basic research and clinical approaches.

To further gather insight into this promising, fast-moving area of research, and discussed therapeutic approach, we welcome articles covering, but not limited to:

• Novel approaches to measuring neuroplasticity in humans to shed light on psychedelic-induced neuroplasticity.
• Investigating whether environmental input has a durable effect on the brain and behavior while a person is undergoing psychedelic therapy.
• Over what duration does this sensitivity occur, and what implications does that have for research and clinical practice?
• Model system for translational approaches to neuroplasticity.
• Comparing and contrasting different types of neuroplasticity that might be relevant to the treatment.
• Molecular basis of psychedelic-induced plasticity to uncover convergent mechanisms.
• Arguments for and against cellular neuroplasticity in and of itself being therapeutic for psychiatric illness.
• Accounts and/or clinical data from clinicians observing a type of higher-order plasticity in patients/participants after taking a psychedelic.
• Neuroplasticity of any sort induced by something non-psychedelic that may help understand psychedelic-induced neuroplasticity.




Dr. Danilo De Gregorio is a consultant for Diamond Therapeutic Inc, Toronto (ON), Canada. All other Topic Editors declare no conflict of interest

Keywords: neuroplasticity, psychedelic, psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, psychiatric illness, sensitivity, clinical, pre-clinical, translational approach


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Neuroplasticity is a concept that has come to encompass many different phenomena, from neurogenesis to synaptogenesis, including psychological and behavioral flexibility. However, the translational links from the molecular level to psychiatric intervention remain imprecise. Additionally, neuroplasticity has both been equated with the mechanism of action for psychiatric treatments on the one hand and described as needing to be paired with therapeutic non-pharmacologic interventions on the other.

This debate is becoming increasingly relevant to this moment in psychedelic research in which there are diverse clinical approaches being conceived and trialed. While the predominant paradigm in psychedelic clinical trials emphasizes a supervised psychedelic experience as central to the intervention, there are also several "non-hallucinogen" psychedelics in the pipeline that aim to isolate the neuroplastic effects of the compounds without the subjective experience. Furthermore, some argue that the extrapharmacologic components of the treatment are superfluous. The paradigm of psychedelic clinical trials in the past decade has been much different than that of traditional psychopharmacology—rather than a medication being taken every day, the compound is administered only once or a few times and is embedded within a psychotherapy process. But as a novel class of non-hallucinogenic psychedelic analogs is continuing along the pipeline towards clinical experimentation, the question urgently arises—how should the induction of neuroplasticity be clinically harnessed for safe and therapeutic use?

The goal of this Research Topic is to start bridging a pre-clinical and clinical understanding of how to measure and harness neuroplasticity in psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy treatments, by combining basic research and clinical approaches.

To further gather insight into this promising, fast-moving area of research, and discussed therapeutic approach, we welcome articles covering, but not limited to:

• Novel approaches to measuring neuroplasticity in humans to shed light on psychedelic-induced neuroplasticity.
• Investigating whether environmental input has a durable effect on the brain and behavior while a person is undergoing psychedelic therapy.
• Over what duration does this sensitivity occur, and what implications does that have for research and clinical practice?
• Model system for translational approaches to neuroplasticity.
• Comparing and contrasting different types of neuroplasticity that might be relevant to the treatment.
• Molecular basis of psychedelic-induced plasticity to uncover convergent mechanisms.
• Arguments for and against cellular neuroplasticity in and of itself being therapeutic for psychiatric illness.
• Accounts and/or clinical data from clinicians observing a type of higher-order plasticity in patients/participants after taking a psychedelic.
• Neuroplasticity of any sort induced by something non-psychedelic that may help understand psychedelic-induced neuroplasticity.




Dr. Danilo De Gregorio is a consultant for Diamond Therapeutic Inc, Toronto (ON), Canada. All other Topic Editors declare no conflict of interest

Keywords: neuroplasticity, psychedelic, psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy, psychiatric illness, sensitivity, clinical, pre-clinical, translational approach


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Topic Coordinators

Loading..

Articles

Sort by:

Loading..

Authors

Loading..

views

total views views downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Share on

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.