Research Topic

Design and Maintenance of Bridges and Transport Infrastructures in Severe Environments

About this Research Topic

Among transport infrastructures, those built in severe environments require a particular attention because of both the environmental degradation processes and of the loading (storms, waves, ice). All severe environments are considered in this research topic with a particular focus on coastal and marine ones. Bridges and wharves in these environments are facing harsh conditions that contribute to both the degradation processes (chloride ingress in concrete, steel corrosion, partial saturation of timber) and the loading (fatigue, large horizontal actions due to vessel berthing, quasi-static loading of extreme events). These structures must also withstand special loading: concentrated loading of the cranes, horizontal cyclic loading of soil from wind, tide or wave actions. Moreover, specific loading due to tide and waves requires careful consideration, especially because existing codes do not account for this in detail. Special attention should be given to these severe or special environments to better design and maintain these associated infrastructures.

Recently, it was proven that the threat of climate change increases the need of research for these structures in this area because of the various effects. Long term modeling suggests a range of climate effects, including an increasing of the range of extreme environmental conditions around the world, that questions the actual current practices and the validity of actual current models. This is an increasing challenge for our societies and researchers. Among these effects, sea level change, and other effects such as changes in water chemical composition and the development of new storms need that researchers must pay special attention in terms of model validity or updating, progressive adaptation of design rules and adaptation of maintenance strategies.

Finally, due to the density of populations in these area, their key economic role and the sensitivity of the socio-economic-ecological systems, sustainability and risk analysis of the actions carried out by stakeholders are of primary concern.

This Research Topic covers these key issues by addressing, and welcoming submissions to the following fields of research:
• improved design,
• optimal structural health monitoring,
• model updating,
• nondestructive testing,
• repair efficiency,
• material and structural reliability.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Among transport infrastructures, those built in severe environments require a particular attention because of both the environmental degradation processes and of the loading (storms, waves, ice). All severe environments are considered in this research topic with a particular focus on coastal and marine ones. Bridges and wharves in these environments are facing harsh conditions that contribute to both the degradation processes (chloride ingress in concrete, steel corrosion, partial saturation of timber) and the loading (fatigue, large horizontal actions due to vessel berthing, quasi-static loading of extreme events). These structures must also withstand special loading: concentrated loading of the cranes, horizontal cyclic loading of soil from wind, tide or wave actions. Moreover, specific loading due to tide and waves requires careful consideration, especially because existing codes do not account for this in detail. Special attention should be given to these severe or special environments to better design and maintain these associated infrastructures.

Recently, it was proven that the threat of climate change increases the need of research for these structures in this area because of the various effects. Long term modeling suggests a range of climate effects, including an increasing of the range of extreme environmental conditions around the world, that questions the actual current practices and the validity of actual current models. This is an increasing challenge for our societies and researchers. Among these effects, sea level change, and other effects such as changes in water chemical composition and the development of new storms need that researchers must pay special attention in terms of model validity or updating, progressive adaptation of design rules and adaptation of maintenance strategies.

Finally, due to the density of populations in these area, their key economic role and the sensitivity of the socio-economic-ecological systems, sustainability and risk analysis of the actions carried out by stakeholders are of primary concern.

This Research Topic covers these key issues by addressing, and welcoming submissions to the following fields of research:
• improved design,
• optimal structural health monitoring,
• model updating,
• nondestructive testing,
• repair efficiency,
• material and structural reliability.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

About Frontiers Research Topics

With their unique mixes of varied contributions from Original Research to Review Articles, Research Topics unify the most influential researchers, the latest key findings and historical advances in a hot research area! Find out more on how to host your own Frontiers Research Topic or contribute to one as an author.

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..

Topic Editors

Loading..

Submission Deadlines

31 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

Loading..
Loading..

total views article views article downloads topic views

}
 
Top countries
Top referring sites
Loading..

Comments

Loading..

Add a comment

Add comment
Back to top