Research Topic

Reliability of Electronic Products and Systems

About this Research Topic

As the world transitions to systems with more electronics and autonomy, including driver-less cars, unmanned airplanes, cutting-edge robotics, advanced telecommunications and energy systems, reliability and safety must be more seriously considered. Systems with poor reliability are not only less likely to successfully carry out their intended missions, but they may also endanger lives. Deficient systems are also much more likely to require extra scheduled and unscheduled maintenance and to demand more spare and replacement parts over their life cycles. In addition, not finding fundamental flaws in a system’s design until after it is deployed can lead to costly program delays, expensive redesigns, and the imposition of operational constraints. Yet the urgency to deploy new technologies and capabilities often leads to systems being fielded with-out having first demonstrated adequate reliability.
Electronic systems must satisfy strict and sometimes conflicting demands for safety and reliability under sometimes harsh conditions while simultaneously offering high functionality at low cost. Meeting these demands is becoming more challenging as the electronics supply chain grows increasingly diffuse and international. Competitive pressures are driving manufacturers to use electronic materials, parts, sub-assemblies, and services obtained from lower cost suppliers and facilities, to design and test more quickly, and to reduce warranty periods
The purpose of this Research Topic is to share best practices and innovative approaches to improve the reliability of electronics products and systems. Articles presenting new methods in data analytics, physics of failure, prognostics, system health monitoring and management, forecasted maintenance, and self-healing electronics systems are encouraged.


Keywords: Data analytics, physics of failure, prognostics, predictive maintenace, health monitoring


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

As the world transitions to systems with more electronics and autonomy, including driver-less cars, unmanned airplanes, cutting-edge robotics, advanced telecommunications and energy systems, reliability and safety must be more seriously considered. Systems with poor reliability are not only less likely to successfully carry out their intended missions, but they may also endanger lives. Deficient systems are also much more likely to require extra scheduled and unscheduled maintenance and to demand more spare and replacement parts over their life cycles. In addition, not finding fundamental flaws in a system’s design until after it is deployed can lead to costly program delays, expensive redesigns, and the imposition of operational constraints. Yet the urgency to deploy new technologies and capabilities often leads to systems being fielded with-out having first demonstrated adequate reliability.
Electronic systems must satisfy strict and sometimes conflicting demands for safety and reliability under sometimes harsh conditions while simultaneously offering high functionality at low cost. Meeting these demands is becoming more challenging as the electronics supply chain grows increasingly diffuse and international. Competitive pressures are driving manufacturers to use electronic materials, parts, sub-assemblies, and services obtained from lower cost suppliers and facilities, to design and test more quickly, and to reduce warranty periods
The purpose of this Research Topic is to share best practices and innovative approaches to improve the reliability of electronics products and systems. Articles presenting new methods in data analytics, physics of failure, prognostics, system health monitoring and management, forecasted maintenance, and self-healing electronics systems are encouraged.


Keywords: Data analytics, physics of failure, prognostics, predictive maintenace, health monitoring


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 October 2017 Manuscript
22 December 2017 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 October 2017 Manuscript
22 December 2017 Manuscript Extension

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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