Research Topic

Protein Secretion Systems in Beneficial Plant-Bacterial Interactions

About this Research Topic

Bacterial protein secretion systems are evolutionarily specialized nanomachines, each responsible for the transport of a specific subset of proteins, small molecules, and DNA into the local environment. Some of the seven protein secretion systems (type I–VI and the unique mycobacterial type VII) were initially identified in pathogenic bacteria and found to have a range of biological functions in bacteria-host interactions, particularly in suppression of host immunity and manipulation of host physiology to support bacterial growth. In plant production systems, plants are not only attacked by a broad spectrum of pathogens but also colonized by a large number of beneficial microorganisms. It is known that beneficial bacteria deploy protein secretion systems for processes such as adhesion, motility, nutrition and antibiosis, and to establish symbiotic and mutualistic relationships with plants. However, with the rapid genome sequencing of plant microbiomes and of a variety of beneficial bacteria, it has become increasingly evident that some secretion systems that were originally postulated to have a specific role in pathogenesis and host interactions, are also present in beneficial plant-associated bacteria. Remarkably, some plant growth-promoting bacteria encode a wide array of secretion systems, including plant pathogen-derived and animal pathogen-derived protein secretion systems. Our knowledge of the function of bacterial protein secretion systems and their impact on plant health is being challenged by these emerging findings.

This Research Topic aims to publish a broad range of papers focused on the structure, function and distribution of protein secretion systems and the involvement of them in beneficial plant-microbial interactions including (but not limited to):

1. Molecular structure, substrates, and ‘omics of protein secretion systems in plant-associated beneficial bacteria;
2. The mechanisms of secretion or/and translocation of protein secretion systems in plant-associated beneficial bacteria;
3. Induced systemic Resistance (ISR), Systemic Acquired Resistance (SAR), plant growth-promoting, and any kinds of plant perception or responses stimulated by plant endophytic, mutualistic, symbiotic bacteria, and generalized biocontrol agents through protein secretion systems;
4. The application of research into protein secretion in bacteria, for example through engineering or inhibiting of protein secretion systems for plant disease control.

Original Research, Review and Opinion papers are all welcome.


Keywords: Protein secretion system, effector, plant growth-promoting, symbiosis, microbime


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Bacterial protein secretion systems are evolutionarily specialized nanomachines, each responsible for the transport of a specific subset of proteins, small molecules, and DNA into the local environment. Some of the seven protein secretion systems (type I–VI and the unique mycobacterial type VII) were initially identified in pathogenic bacteria and found to have a range of biological functions in bacteria-host interactions, particularly in suppression of host immunity and manipulation of host physiology to support bacterial growth. In plant production systems, plants are not only attacked by a broad spectrum of pathogens but also colonized by a large number of beneficial microorganisms. It is known that beneficial bacteria deploy protein secretion systems for processes such as adhesion, motility, nutrition and antibiosis, and to establish symbiotic and mutualistic relationships with plants. However, with the rapid genome sequencing of plant microbiomes and of a variety of beneficial bacteria, it has become increasingly evident that some secretion systems that were originally postulated to have a specific role in pathogenesis and host interactions, are also present in beneficial plant-associated bacteria. Remarkably, some plant growth-promoting bacteria encode a wide array of secretion systems, including plant pathogen-derived and animal pathogen-derived protein secretion systems. Our knowledge of the function of bacterial protein secretion systems and their impact on plant health is being challenged by these emerging findings.

This Research Topic aims to publish a broad range of papers focused on the structure, function and distribution of protein secretion systems and the involvement of them in beneficial plant-microbial interactions including (but not limited to):

1. Molecular structure, substrates, and ‘omics of protein secretion systems in plant-associated beneficial bacteria;
2. The mechanisms of secretion or/and translocation of protein secretion systems in plant-associated beneficial bacteria;
3. Induced systemic Resistance (ISR), Systemic Acquired Resistance (SAR), plant growth-promoting, and any kinds of plant perception or responses stimulated by plant endophytic, mutualistic, symbiotic bacteria, and generalized biocontrol agents through protein secretion systems;
4. The application of research into protein secretion in bacteria, for example through engineering or inhibiting of protein secretion systems for plant disease control.

Original Research, Review and Opinion papers are all welcome.


Keywords: Protein secretion system, effector, plant growth-promoting, symbiosis, microbime


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

31 March 2018 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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