Research Topic

Particulate Matter Pollution in the Atmosphere

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About this Research Topic

Human activities causing release of the greenhouse gases (GHGs) and aerosols have been identified as the most important drivers of climate change. Compared to a relatively homogeneous distribution of GHG emissions around the globe, the peak concentrations of atmospheric aerosols generally restricted to their primary source regions, and thus giving rise to regional pollution hot-spots. Particulate matter consists of tiny suspended particles in the atmosphere, including dust, salt, soot, pollen and liquid particles. It can be directly emitted to the atmosphere through combustion processes or transformed through chemical reactions such as SO2. The aerosols are also found to be transported from their source regions to remote pristine places such as the Himalayan-Hindukush, inflicting perturbations in planetary albedo of the glaciers. The particles usually range from coarse to ultra-fine sizes.

Ambient particulate matter adversely affects health, in particular the respiratory system and thus, reduces life expectancy. It is, therefore, suggested that reduction in the emissions of atmospheric pollutants, most of which have shorter atmospheric lifetime compared to that of some GHGs, can be an effective controlling mechanism toward the mitigation of regional climate change and thus, slowing down the global warming, in addition to its positive impact on air quality and human health. Atmospheric aerosol pollutants are, therefore, postulated to have a significant impact on the public health and regional climate, including perturbations on the regional water cycle. Henceforth, monitoring, modeling and updating information on particulate matter pollution in the atmosphere is highly warranted.

This Research Topic aims at reporting the recent advances in atmospheric particulate matter research. We encourage the authors to cover various aspects, including the measurements and modelling of particulate matter and its impact on health and climate change.


Keywords: Particulate Matter, Atmospheric Pollution, Aerosols, Public Health, Climate Change


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Human activities causing release of the greenhouse gases (GHGs) and aerosols have been identified as the most important drivers of climate change. Compared to a relatively homogeneous distribution of GHG emissions around the globe, the peak concentrations of atmospheric aerosols generally restricted to their primary source regions, and thus giving rise to regional pollution hot-spots. Particulate matter consists of tiny suspended particles in the atmosphere, including dust, salt, soot, pollen and liquid particles. It can be directly emitted to the atmosphere through combustion processes or transformed through chemical reactions such as SO2. The aerosols are also found to be transported from their source regions to remote pristine places such as the Himalayan-Hindukush, inflicting perturbations in planetary albedo of the glaciers. The particles usually range from coarse to ultra-fine sizes.

Ambient particulate matter adversely affects health, in particular the respiratory system and thus, reduces life expectancy. It is, therefore, suggested that reduction in the emissions of atmospheric pollutants, most of which have shorter atmospheric lifetime compared to that of some GHGs, can be an effective controlling mechanism toward the mitigation of regional climate change and thus, slowing down the global warming, in addition to its positive impact on air quality and human health. Atmospheric aerosol pollutants are, therefore, postulated to have a significant impact on the public health and regional climate, including perturbations on the regional water cycle. Henceforth, monitoring, modeling and updating information on particulate matter pollution in the atmosphere is highly warranted.

This Research Topic aims at reporting the recent advances in atmospheric particulate matter research. We encourage the authors to cover various aspects, including the measurements and modelling of particulate matter and its impact on health and climate change.


Keywords: Particulate Matter, Atmospheric Pollution, Aerosols, Public Health, Climate Change


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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